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The impact of the Great Recession and the housing crisis on the financing of America's largest cities

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  • Chernick, Howard
  • Langley, Adam
  • Reschovsky, Andrew

Abstract

The housing crisis and the recession have placed tremendous fiscal pressure on the nation's central cities. Cuts in state government fiscal assistance to their local governments, plus shrinking property tax bases are challenging the ability of local governments to continue their current levels of public services. In this paper, we use data on the financing of the nation's largest central cities from 1997 to 2008 to forecast the impact of the recession and the housing crisis on central city expenditures between 2009 and 2013. Because expenditure responsibilities vary among city governments and because overlying governments play different roles, we develop the concept of constructed governments in order to allow us to compare the revenue-raising and spending policies of large central cities. We predict that real per capita spending in the average central city will be reduced by about seven percent during the forecast period, and that spending cuts will be substantially greater in cities hit hardest by the economic recession and the housing market collapse.

Suggested Citation

  • Chernick, Howard & Langley, Adam & Reschovsky, Andrew, 2011. "The impact of the Great Recession and the housing crisis on the financing of America's largest cities," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 372-381, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:41:y:2011:i:4:p:372-381
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David L. Sjoquist & Mary Beth Walker & Sally Wallace, 2005. "Estimating Differential Responses to Local Fiscal Conditions: A Mixture Model Analysis," Public Finance Review, , vol. 33(1), pages 36-61, January.
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    3. Alm, James & Buschman, Robert D. & Sjoquist, David L., 2011. "Rethinking local government reliance on the property tax," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 320-331, July.
    4. Lutz, Byron & Molloy, Raven & Shan, Hui, 2011. "The housing crisis and state and local government tax revenue: Five channels," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 306-319, July.
    5. Byron F. Lutz, 2008. "The connection between house price appreciation and property tax revenues," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2008-48, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    6. Lutz, Byron F., 2008. "The Connection Between House Price Appreciation and Property Tax Revenues," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 61(3), pages 555-572, September.
    7. Doerner, William M. & Ihlanfeldt, Keith R., 2011. "House prices and city revenues," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 332-342, July.
    8. Skidmore, Mark & Scorsone, Eric, 2011. "Causes and consequences of fiscal stress in Michigan cities," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 360-371, July.
    9. repec:fip:fedgsq:y:2011:x:5 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Kalena E. Cortes & Andrew I. Friedson, 2014. "Ranking Up by Moving Out: The Effect of the Texas Top 10% Plan on Property Values," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 67(1), pages 51-76, March.
    2. Kevin Spiritus & Robin Boadway, 2017. "The Optimal Taxation of Risky Capital Income: The Rate of Return Allowance," CESifo Working Paper Series 6297, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Feler, Leo & Senses, Mine Zeynep, 2016. "Trade Shocks and the Provision of Local Public Goods," IZA Discussion Papers 10231, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Andrew Feltenstein & Nour Abdul-Razzak & Jeffrey Condon & Biplab Kumar Datta, 2015. "Tax Evasion, the Provision of Public Infrastructure and Growth: A General Equilibrium Approach to Two Very Different Countries, Egypt and Mauritius," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 24(suppl_2), pages 43-72.
    5. Sebastian Schipper, 2014. "The Financial Crisis and the Hegemony of Urban Neoliberalism: Lessons from Frankfurt am Main," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(1), pages 236-255, January.

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