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Unions, wage differential and indeterminacy


  • De Palma, Francesco
  • Seegmuller, Thomas


In this paper, we are interested in the influence of labor market structure and wage differential on the occurrence of endogenous fluctuations. For this purpose, we introduce unions and dual labor market in an overlapping generations model. We compare the conditions for indeterminacy with respect to two different bargaining processes: the right-to-manage model and the efficiency bargaining model.
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  • De Palma, Francesco & Seegmuller, Thomas, 2004. "Unions, wage differential and indeterminacy," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 205-218, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:reecon:v:58:y:2004:i:3:p:205-218

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Basu, Susanto & Fernald, John G., 1995. "Are apparent productive spillovers a figment of specification error?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 165-188, August.
    2. Benhabib Jess & Farmer Roger E. A., 1994. "Indeterminacy and Increasing Returns," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 19-41, June.
    3. Ian M. McDonald & Robert M. Solow, 1985. "Wages and Employment in a Segmented Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 100(4), pages 1115-1141.
    4. De Palma, Francesco & Seegmuller, Thomas, 2005. "Dual Labor Market And Endogenous Fluctuations," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(03), pages 398-411, June.
    5. Aloi, Marta & Dixon, Huw D. & Lloyd-Braga, Teresa, 2000. "Endogenous fluctuations in an open economy with increasing returns to scale," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 97-125, January.
    6. Farmer Roger E. A. & Guo Jang-Ting, 1994. "Real Business Cycles and the Animal Spirits Hypothesis," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 42-72, June.
    7. McDonald, Ian M & Solow, Robert M, 1981. "Wage Bargaining and Employment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(5), pages 896-908, December.
    8. Benhabib, Jess & Farmer, Roger E.A., 1999. "Indeterminacy and sunspots in macroeconomics," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 6, pages 387-448 Elsevier.
    9. Benhabib, Jess & Nishimura, Kazuo, 1998. "Indeterminacy and Sunspots with Constant Returns," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 58-96, July.
    10. Cazzavillan, Guido & Lloyd-Braga, Teresa & Pintus, Patrick A., 1998. "Multiple Steady States and Endogenous Fluctuations with Increasing Returns to Scale in Production," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 60-107, May.
    11. Basu, Susanto & Fernald, John G, 1997. "Returns to Scale in U.S. Production: Estimates and Implications," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(2), pages 249-283, April.
    12. Devereux, Michael B. & Lockwood, Ben, 1991. "Trade unions, non-binding wage agreements, and capital accumulation," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(7), pages 1411-1426, October.
    13. Burnside, Craig, 1996. "Production function regressions, returns to scale, and externalities," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 177-201, April.
    14. Nishimura, Kazuo, 1985. "Competitive equilibrium cycles," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 284-306, August.
    15. Jorgen Jacobsen, Hans, 2000. "Endogenous, imperfectly competitive business cycles," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 305-336, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sjögren, Tomas, 2017. "Can a Marginally Distorted Labor Market Improve Capital Accumulation, Output and Welfare?," Umeå Economic Studies 946, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
    2. Koskela, Erkki & Puhakka, Mikko, 2007. "Stability and Dynamics in an Overlapping Generations Economy with Flexible Wage Negotiations," IZA Discussion Papers 3246, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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