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Extreme returns and the investor’s expectation for future volatility: Evidence from the Finnish stock market

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  • Ali, Syed Riaz Mahmood
  • Ahmed, Shaker
  • Östermark, Ralf

Abstract

We examine the significance of extreme positive returns of the previous month (MAX) as a return predictor in the Finnish stock market. We show that high fear months, i.e., months associated with the investor’s high expectation for future volatility, are accompanying with low MAX effect implying that investors reluctant to gamble in high MAX stocks when they have high expectation for future volatility.

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  • Ali, Syed Riaz Mahmood & Ahmed, Shaker & Östermark, Ralf, 2020. "Extreme returns and the investor’s expectation for future volatility: Evidence from the Finnish stock market," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 260-269.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:quaeco:v:76:y:2020:i:c:p:260-269
    DOI: 10.1016/j.qref.2019.08.009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ali, Syed Riaz Mahmood & Rahman, M Arifur & Hasan, Mohammad Nurul & Östermark, Ralf, 2020. "Positive IVOL-MAX effect: A study on the Singapore Stock Market," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 54(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    MAX effect; Extreme return; Sentiment;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G30 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - General
    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill

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