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Family regulation as a moving target in the demographic transition

  • Bonneuil, Noël
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    The consideration of mortality changes equilibrium with unilateral gifts in the economics of family regulation. Expressions for each spouse's allocation to the common good are obtained that are consistent with the pre-eminent role of mortality in the fertility decline. The other determinant of equilibrium is the husband-wife productivity ratio. Furthermore, in a context of demographic transition, the adjustment of allocations to their equilibrium values may be not instantaneous, and the transition resembles the pursuit of a moving target rather than a shift in equilibrium. One consequence is the lack of correlation between the fertility decline and economic variables.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Mathematical Social Sciences.

    Volume (Year): 59 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 2 (March)
    Pages: 239-248

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:matsoc:v:59:y:2010:i:2:p:239-248
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    7. Raouf BOUCEKKINE & David DE LA CROIX & Omar LICANDRO, 2004. "Modelling vintage structures with DDEs: principles and applications," Economics Working Papers ECO2004/06, European University Institute.
    8. Bonneuil, Noel, 1994. "Capital Accumulation, Inertia of Consumption and Norms of Reproduction," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 7(1), pages 49-62.
    9. David N. Weil & Oded Galor, 2000. "Population, Technology, and Growth: From Malthusian Stagnation to the Demographic Transition and Beyond," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 806-828, September.
    10. Weir, David R., 1984. "Life Under Pressure: France and England, 1670–1870," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 44(01), pages 27-47, March.
    11. Lundberg, Shelly & Pollak, Robert A, 1993. "Separate Spheres Bargaining and the Marriage Market," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(6), pages 988-1010, December.
    12. Alwyn Young, 2005. "The Gift of the Dying: The Tragedy of AIDS and the Welfare of Future African Generations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(2), pages 423-466.
    13. Maddison, Angus, 1987. "Growth and Slowdown in Advanced Capitalist Economies: Techniques of Quantitative Assessment," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 25(2), pages 649-98, June.
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