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‘All in’: Snow crab, capitalization, and the future of small-scale fisheries in Newfoundland

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  • Davis, Reade

Abstract

The collapse of cod stocks off the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador in the early 1990s has been widely identified as one of the greatest human-ecological catastrophes of the 20th century. In the aftermath of the crisis, heated debates took place about how the fishery should be structured in the future in order to facilitate the recovery of stocks and sustain coastal livelihoods. In the end, the trade union representing fishers and fish processing plant workers in the province proved successful in resisting pressures from fish processing companies to introduce full-scale privatization. It was also able to expand access to the lucrative snow crab fishery, thereby improving incomes for most remaining independent fishers in the province. Nevertheless, this paper argues that policy changes made shortly after cod moratorium, in combination with changing environmental, demographic, and market conditions, have created a situation which now threatens to undermine the capacity for small-scale fishing enterprises to remain independently owned and operated into the future.

Suggested Citation

  • Davis, Reade, 2015. "‘All in’: Snow crab, capitalization, and the future of small-scale fisheries in Newfoundland," Marine Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 323-330.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:marpol:v:61:y:2015:i:c:p:323-330
    DOI: 10.1016/j.marpol.2015.04.008
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    References listed on IDEAS

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