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Local Public Finance in the Aftermath of September 11

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  • Wildasin, David E.

Abstract

The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, present significant challenges for policymakers at all levels of government. Since terrorism seems to present particularly acute risks for core urban areas, it may influence economic and policy decisions in ways that affect the spatial distribution of population and economic activity. These impacts, however, will depend importantly on the assignment of responsibilities among Federal, state, and local governments for dealing with terrorism and on the distribution of the costs of these responsibilities. The policy interactions among different levels of government, and between the private and the public sectors, should provide students of political economy with much insight into the nature of the policy process in the American federation.
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Suggested Citation

  • Wildasin, David E., 2002. "Local Public Finance in the Aftermath of September 11," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 225-237, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:51:y:2002:i:2:p:225-237
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    1. Wildasin, David E., 1991. "Some rudimetary 'duopolity' theory," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 393-421, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bruno S. Frey & Simon Luechinger & Alois Stutzer, 2007. "Calculating Tragedy: Assessing The Costs Of Terrorism," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(1), pages 1-24, February.
    2. David E. Wildasin, 2006. "Disasters: Issues for State and Federal Government Finances," Working Papers 2006-07, University of Kentucky, Institute for Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations.
    3. Rossi-Hansberg, Esteban, 2004. "Cities under stress," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(5), pages 903-927, July.
    4. Luca Salvadori, 2015. "Does tax enforcement counteract the negative effects of terrorism? A case study of the Basque Country," Working Papers 2015/9, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    5. Christian L. Redfearn, 2004. "Land Markets & Terrorism: Uncovering Perceptions of Risk by Examining Land Price Changes Following 9/11," Working Paper 8591, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
    6. Konstantinos Drakos & Panagiotis Th. Konstantinou, 2011. "Terrorism Shocks and Public Spending: Panel VAR Evidence from Europe," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 48, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    7. Luca Salvadori, 2015. "Does tax enforcement counteract the negative effects of terrorism? A case study of the Basque country," ERSA conference papers ersa15p1465, European Regional Science Association.
    8. O’Flaherty, Brendan & Sethi, Rajiv, 2015. "Urban Crime," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D6 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics
    • D7 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making
    • H - Public Economics

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