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What determines the breadth and depth of Zambia's backward linkages to copper mining? The role of public policy and value chain dynamics

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  • Fessehaie, Judith

Abstract

This paper investigates the dynamics of upstream linkages development to copper mining in Zambia. The breadth and depth of the local mining supply chain was deeply shaped by policies adopted in the 1990s under the Structural Adjustment Programme. These policies succeeded in attracting much-needed FDI in the mining sector, including Chinese and Indian FDI, but had a negative impact on the level of value-addition undertaken by local suppliers. In the post-privatisation era, the dynamics of the local supply chain suggest that supply firms' upgrading and sales growth were determined by firm ownership and value chain governance. In fact, forward linkages to buyers other than Chinese and Indian mining companies, and backward linkages to parent companies and technology providers were critical in supporting supply firms' success in the mining value chain.

Suggested Citation

  • Fessehaie, Judith, 2012. "What determines the breadth and depth of Zambia's backward linkages to copper mining? The role of public policy and value chain dynamics," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 443-451.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jrpoli:v:37:y:2012:i:4:p:443-451
    DOI: 10.1016/j.resourpol.2012.06.003
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    Cited by:

    1. Judith Fessehaie & Zavareh Rustomjee & Lauralyn Kaziboni, 2016. "Can mining promote industrialization? A comparative analysis of policy frameworks in three Southern African countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 083, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Judith Fessehaie & Zavareh Rustomjee & Lauralyn Kaziboni, 2016. "Mining-related national systems of innovation in southern Africa National trajectories and regional integration," WIDER Working Paper Series 084, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Adrian Boos & Karin Holm-Müller, 2016. "The Zambian Resource Curse and its influence on Genuine Savings as an indicator for “weak” sustainable development," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 18(3), pages 881-919, June.

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