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An econometric model of potential output, productivity growth, and resource utilization

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  • Coen, Robert M.
  • Hickman, Bert G.

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  • Coen, Robert M. & Hickman, Bert G., 2006. "An econometric model of potential output, productivity growth, and resource utilization," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 645-664, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:28:y:2006:i:4:p:645-664
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Karl Whelan, 2000. "A guide to the use of chain aggregated NIPA data," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2000-35, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. Dale W. Jorgenson & Kevin J. Stiroh, 2000. "Raising the Speed Limit: U.S. Economic Growth in the Information Age," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 31(1), pages 125-236.
    3. Stephen D. Oliner & Daniel E. Sichel, 2000. "The Resurgence of Growth in the Late 1990s: Is Information Technology the Story?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 3-22, Fall.
    4. D. W. Jorgenson & Z. Griliches, 1967. "The Explanation of Productivity Change," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 34(3), pages 249-283.
    5. Michael L. Wachter, 1976. "The Changing Cyclical Responsiveness of Wage Inflation," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 7(1), pages 115-168.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lin, Hongbo & Zhang, Xiaoling & Chen, Zhenling & Zheng, Heyun, 2020. "Estimating the potential output and output gap for China's coal cities with pollutants reduction," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C).
    2. Chen, Zhenling & Zhao, Weigang & Zheng, Heyun, 2021. "Potential output gap in China's regional coal-fired power sector under the constraint of carbon emission reduction," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 148(PA).
    3. Durech, Richard & Minea, Alexandru & Mustea, Lavinia & Slusna, Lubica, 2014. "Regional evidence on Okun's Law in Czech Republic and Slovakia," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 57-65.
    4. Hélène Syed Zwick & S. Ali Shah Syed, 2016. "Augmented okun's law within the emu: working-time or employment adjustment? a structural equation model," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 36(1), pages 440-448.

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