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Declining long-term employment in Japan

  • Kawaguchi, Daiji
  • Ueno, Yuko

This paper documents the secular decline of average job tenure in Japan based on microdata from two representative government surveys: the household-based Employment Status Survey (ESS) and the establishment-based Basic Survey on Wage Structure (BSWS). Male workers born in 1970 have experienced about 20% fewer years of job tenure than those born in 1944 at a given age, based on an analysis of ESS data. The decline of the long-term employment relationship is uniformly observed across firm sizes and industries. Among job changers, the fraction of voluntary job changes, as well as that of job changes associated with wage increase, has been stable.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of the Japanese and International Economies.

Volume (Year): 28 (2013)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 19-36

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jjieco:v:28:y:2013:i:c:p:19-36
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622903

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  1. Peter AUER & Sandrine CAZES, 2000. "The resilience of the long-term employment relationship: Evidence from the industrialized countries," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 139(4), pages 379-408, December.
  2. Macleod, W.B. & Kanemoto, Y., 1990. "Firm Reputation and Self-Enforcing Labour Contracts," Cahiers de recherche 9026, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
  3. Mincer, Jacob & Higuchi, Yoshio, 1988. "Wage structures and labor turnover in the United States and Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 97-133, June.
  4. Chiaki Moriguchi, 2003. "Implicit Contracts, the Great Depression, and Institutional Change: A Comparative Analysis of U.S. and Japanese Employment Relations, 1920-1940," NBER Working Papers 9559, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Junya Hamaaki & Masahiro Hori & Saeko Maeda & Keiko Murata, 2012. "Changes in the Japanese Employment System in the Two Lost Decades," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 65(4), pages 810-846, October.
  6. Hashimoto, Masanori & Raisian, John, 1985. "Employment Tenure and Earnings Profiles in Japan and the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 721-35, September.
  7. Satoshi Shimizutani & Izumi Yokoyama, 2009. "Japan's Long-Term Employment Practice Survived? Developments Since the 1990s," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 62(3), pages 313-326, April.
  8. "Chuma, Hiroyuki", 1987. "Economic Rational of “Japanese” Employment Practices Revisited--From Japan-U.S. Historical Perspective in the 1920s--," Economic Review, Hitotsubashi University, vol. 38(4), pages 307-320, January.
  9. Robert H. Topel, 1990. "Specific Capital, Mobility, and Wages: Wages Rise with Job Seniority," NBER Working Papers 3294, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Kato, Takao, 2001. "The End of Lifetime Employment in Japan?: Evidence from National Surveys and Field Research," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 489-514, December.
  11. Uta Schönberg, 2007. "Wage Growth Due to Human Capital Accumulation and Job Search: A Comparison between the United States and Germany," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 60(4), pages 562-586, July.
  12. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521642408 is not listed on IDEAS
  13. Henry S. Farber, 2007. "Labor Market Adjustment to Globalization: Long-Term Employment in the United States and Japan," Working Papers 1040, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  14. Ono, Hiroshi, 2006. "Lifetime Employment in Japan: Concepts and Measurements," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 624, Stockholm School of Economics, revised 06 Apr 2007.
  15. Uta Schönberg, 2007. "Wage Growth Due to Human Capital Accumulation and Job Search: A Comparison between the United States and Germany," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 60(4), pages 562-586, July.
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