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Adaptation investments and homeownership

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  • Hansen, Jørgen Drud
  • Skak, Morten

Abstract

This article develops a model where ownership improves the efficiency of the housing market as it enhances the utility of housing consumption for some consumers. The model is based on an extended Hotelling-Lancaster utility approach in which the ideal variant of housing is obtainable only by adapting the home through a supplementary investment. Ownership offers low costs of adaptation, but has high contract costs compared with renting. Consumers simultaneously choose housing demand and tenure, and because of the different cost structure only consumers with strong preferences for individual adaptation of the home choose ownership. This article analyses the consumer's optimization. The model provides an explanation for the observation that homeowners typically live in larger dwelling units than tenants. It also provides an explanation for a high price of housing services tending to reduce homeownership rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Hansen, Jørgen Drud & Skak, Morten, 2008. "Adaptation investments and homeownership," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 102-115, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhouse:v:17:y:2008:i:1:p:102-115
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hans-Werner Sinn, 2000. "EU Enlargement, Migration, and Lessons from German Unification," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 1(3), pages 299-314, August.
    2. Smith, Lawrence B & Rosen, Kenneth T & Fallis, George, 1988. "Recent Developments in Economic Models of Housing Markets," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 26(1), pages 29-64, March.
    3. Henderson, J Vernon & Ioannides, Yannis M, 1983. "A Model of Housing Tenure Choice," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(1), pages 98-113, March.
    4. Ortalo-Magne, Francois & Rady, Sven, 2002. "Tenure choice and the riskiness of non-housing consumption," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 266-279, September.
    5. Swan, Craig, 1984. "A model of rental and owner-occupied housing," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 297-316, November.
    6. Black, Dan & Gates, Gary & Sanders, Seth & Taylor, Lowell, 2002. "Why Do Gay Men Live in San Francisco?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 54-76, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Aviad Tur-Sinai, 2014. "Adaptation patterns and consumer behavior as a dependency on terror," Mind & Society: Cognitive Studies in Economics and Social Sciences, Springer;Fondazione Rosselli, vol. 13(2), pages 257-269, November.
    2. Bloze, Gintautas & Skak, Morten, 2011. "Homeownership and ill-being," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 5/2011, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.
    3. Josep Maria Raya & Aleksander Kucel, 2016. "Did Housing Taxation Contribute to Increase Riskier Borrowing?," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 53(1), pages 90-113, July.
    4. Samwel Alananga, 2017. "The value of formal titles to ownership in residential property transactions: Evidence from Kinondoni municipality Tanzania," ERES eres2017_19, European Real Estate Society (ERES).
    5. Bloze, Gintautas & Skak, Morten, 2010. "Homeownership and subjective well-being," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 5/2010, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.

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