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Income-related inequality in life-years and quality-adjusted life-years

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  • Gerdtham, Ulf-G.
  • Johannesson, Magnus

Abstract

We estimate the income-related inequality in Sweden with respect to life-years and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). We use a large data-set from Sweden with over 40,000 individuals followed up for 10-16 years, to estimate the survival and quality-adjusted survival in different income groups. For both life-years and QALYs we discover inequalities in health favouring the higher income groups. For men (women) in the youngest age-group (20-29 years) the number of QALYs is 43.7 (45.7) in the lowest income decile and 47.2 (49.0) in the highest income decile.
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  • Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Johannesson, Magnus, 2000. "Income-related inequality in life-years and quality-adjusted life-years," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 1007-1026, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:19:y:2000:i:6:p:1007-1026
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D30 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - General
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior

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