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Socio-economic health inequalities in Brazil: gender and age effects

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  • M. Dolores Montoya Diaz

    (Department of Economics, Economics, Management and Accounting Faculty (FEA-RP), University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto Campus, Av. dos Bandeirantes, 3900 14049-900 - Ribeirão Preto, SP, São Paulo, Brazil)

Abstract

This paper analyses Brazilian socio-economic inequalities in health by measuring the concentration indices for the following variables: health expectancy, self-assessed health status and chronic health problems. Data used were taken from the 1996|1997 Living Standard Measurement Study (LSMS). In summary, as far as gender distinction is concerned, the results showed that up to 5 years of age the mortality rates, reported appearance of chronic health problems as well as the self-assessed health indicated that the boys were in worse health condition than the girls. After this age group there was a tendency for differences to disappear until adulthood, when the situation changed and the women consistently considered themselves less healthy. With reference to the socio-economic inequalities, one generally finds larger differences within the women's groups. The analysis for the different age groups indicated that the pro-rich inequalities increased with age. Both results were clearly proved, especially for the health expectancy variable, by adopting an adjustment of the dominance concept derived from literature on economic inequalities, consisting of comparing concentration curves. Copyright © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • M. Dolores Montoya Diaz, 2002. "Socio-economic health inequalities in Brazil: gender and age effects," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(2), pages 141-154.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:11:y:2002:i:2:p:141-154
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.649
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. van Doorslaer, Eddy & Wagstaff, Adam & Bleichrodt, Han & Calonge, Samuel & Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Gerfin, Michael & Geurts, Jose & Gross, Lorna & Hakkinen, Unto & Leu, Robert E., 1997. "Income-related inequalities in health: some international comparisons," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 93-112, February.
    5. Gerdtham, U. -G. & Johannesson, M. & Lundberg, L. & Isacson, D., 1999. "A note on validating Wagstaff and van Doorslaer's health measure in the analysis of inequalities in health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 117-124, January.
    6. Macintyre, Sally & Hunt, Kate & Sweeting, Helen, 1996. "Gender differences in health: Are things really as simple as they seem?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 42(4), pages 617-624, February.
    7. Van Oyen, Herman & Tafforeau, Jean & Roelands, Marc, 1996. "Regional inequities in health expectancy in Belgium," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 43(11), pages 1673-1678, December.
    8. Kakwani, Nanak & Wagstaff, Adam & van Doorslaer, Eddy, 1997. "Socioeconomic inequalities in health: Measurement, computation, and statistical inference," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 87-103, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Matthias Rieger & Sofia Karina Trommlerová, 2016. "Age-Specific Correlates of Child Growth," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(1), pages 241-267, February.
    2. Charasse-Pouélé, Cécile & Fournier, Martin, 2006. "Health disparities between racial groups in South Africa: A decomposition analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(11), pages 2897-2914, June.
    3. Lisa Cameron & Jenny Williams, 2009. "Is the relationship between socioeconomic status and health stronger for older children in developing countries?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 46(2), pages 303-324, May.
    4. repec:spr:soinre:v:136:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s11205-017-1558-8 is not listed on IDEAS

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