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Large roommate problem with non-transferable random utility


  • Pęski, Marcin


We analyze a large roommate problem (i.e., marriage matching in which the marriage is not restricted solely to matchings between men and women) with non-transferable utility. It is well known that while a roommate problem may not have a stable proper matching, each roommate problem does have an stable improper matching. In a random utility model with types from Dagsvik (2000) and Menzel (2015), we show that all improper stable matchings are asymptotically close to being a proper stable matching. Moreover, the distribution of types in stable matchings (proper or not) converges to the unique maximizer of an expression that is a sum of two terms: the average “welfare” of the matching and the Shannon entropy of the distribution. In the noiseless limit, when the random component of the utility is reduced to zero, the distribution of types of matched pairs converges to the outcome of the transferable utility model.

Suggested Citation

  • Pęski, Marcin, 2017. "Large roommate problem with non-transferable random utility," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 168(C), pages 432-471.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jetheo:v:168:y:2017:i:c:p:432-471 DOI: 10.1016/j.jet.2016.12.012

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Tayfun Sönmez & Alvin E. Roth & M. Utku Ünver, 2007. "Efficient Kidney Exchange: Coincidence of Wants in Markets with Compatibility-Based Preferences," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(3), pages 828-851, June.
    2. Konrad Menzel, 2015. "Large Matching Markets as Two‐Sided Demand Systems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 83(3), pages 897-941, May.
    3. Dagsvik, John K, 2000. "Aggregation in Matching Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 41(1), pages 27-57, February.
    4. Parag A. Pathak & Alvin E. Roth, 2013. "Matching with Couples: Stability and Incentives in Large Markets," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(4), pages 1585-1632.
    5. repec:hrv:faseco:30831454 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Pierre-André Chiappori & Alfred Galichon & Bernard Salanié, 2012. "The Roommate Problem is More Stable than You Think," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/3sd5loegec9, Sciences Po.
    7. Bernard Salanié & Alfred Galichon, 2012. "Cupid's Invisible Hand: Social Surplus and Identification in Matching Models," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/5rkqqmvrn4t, Sciences Po.
    8. Fuhito Kojima & Parag A. Pathak, 2009. "Incentives and Stability in Large Two-Sided Matching Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(3), pages 608-627, June.
    9. Eugene Choo & Aloysius Siow, 2006. "Who Marries Whom and Why," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 114(1), pages 175-201, February.
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    More about this item


    Matching; Random utility; Large market;

    JEL classification:

    • C78 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Bargaining Theory; Matching Theory


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