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Dynamic portfolio choice with frictions

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  • Gârleanu, Nicolae
  • Pedersen, Lasse Heje

Abstract

We show how portfolio choice can be modeled in continuous time with transitory and persistent transaction costs, multiple assets, multiple signals predicting returns, and general signal dynamics. The objective function is derived from the limit of discrete-time models with endogenous transaction costs due to optimal dealer behavior. We solve the model explicitly and the intuitive solution is also the limit of the solutions of the corresponding discrete-time models. We show how the optimal high-frequency trading strategy depends on the nature of the trading costs, which in turn depend on dealers' inventory dynamics. Finally, we provide equilibrium implications and illustrate the model's broader applicability to micro- and macro-economics, monetary policy, and political economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Gârleanu, Nicolae & Pedersen, Lasse Heje, 2016. "Dynamic portfolio choice with frictions," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 165(C), pages 487-516.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jetheo:v:165:y:2016:i:c:p:487-516
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jet.2016.06.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bruno Bouchard & Masaaki Fukasawa & Martin Herdegen & Johannes Muhle-Karbe, 2018. "Equilibrium Returns with Transaction Costs," Post-Print hal-01569408, HAL.
    2. Ibrahim Ekren & Johannes Muhle-Karbe, 2017. "Portfolio Choice with Small Temporary and Transient Price Impact," Papers 1705.00672, arXiv.org, revised Mar 2018.
    3. Bruno Bouchard & Masaaki Fukasawa & Martin Herdegen & Johannes Muhle-Karbe, 2017. "Equilibrium Returns with Transaction Costs," Papers 1707.08464, arXiv.org, revised Apr 2018.
    4. Johannes Muhle-Karbe & Max Reppen & H. Mete Soner, 2016. "A Primer on Portfolio Choice with Small Transaction Costs," Papers 1612.01302, arXiv.org, revised May 2017.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Dynamic trading; Frictions; Transaction costs; Continuous time; Predictability; Equilibrium;

    JEL classification:

    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G23 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Non-bank Financial Institutions; Financial Instruments; Institutional Investors
    • C6 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling
    • D53 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Financial Markets
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy

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