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Perceptions of inevitability and demand for redistribution: Evidence from a survey experiment

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  • Pellicer, Miquel
  • Piraino, Patrizio
  • Wegner, Eva

Abstract

Believing that inequality is inevitable may limit demand for redistribution. We explore this idea with a survey experiment in South Africa, one of the most unequal countries in the world. Inevitability beliefs can be influenced by learning about lower inequality elsewhere. We find that the demand for redistributive policies reacts to this information, while it is insensitive to other types of information/messages. Our analysis suggests a promising, and heretofore unexplored, avenue of research for refining our understanding of the determinants of demand for redistribution.

Suggested Citation

  • Pellicer, Miquel & Piraino, Patrizio & Wegner, Eva, 2019. "Perceptions of inevitability and demand for redistribution: Evidence from a survey experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 274-288.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:159:y:2019:i:c:p:274-288
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2017.12.013
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Inequality; Demand for redistribution;

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