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Linking exposure to strain with anger: an investigation of deviant adaptations

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  • Mazerolle, Paul
  • Piquero, Alex

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  • Mazerolle, Paul & Piquero, Alex, 1998. "Linking exposure to strain with anger: an investigation of deviant adaptations," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 195-211, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jcjust:v:26:y:1998:i:3:p:195-211
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    Cited by:

    1. Morris, Robert G. & Carriaga, Michael L. & Diamond, Brie & Piquero, Nicole Leeper & Piquero, Alex R., 2012. "Does prison strain lead to prison misbehavior? An application of general strain theory to inmate misconduct," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 194-201.
    2. Baron, Stephen W. & Hartnagel, Timothy F., 2002. "Street youth and labor market strain," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 519-533.
    3. Ostrowsky, Michael K. & Messner, Steven F., 2005. "Explaining crime for a young adult population: An application of general strain theory," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 463-476.
    4. Swatt, Marc L. & Gibson, Chris L. & Piquero, Nicole Leeper, 2007. "Exploring the utility of general strain theory in explaining problematic alcohol consumption by police officers," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 596-611, December.
    5. Eitle, David, 2010. "General strain theory, persistence, and desistance among young adult males," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 1113-1121, November.
    6. Mazerolle, Paul & Burton, Velmer S. & Cullen, Francis T. & Evans, T. David & Payne, Gary L., 2000. "Strain, anger, and delinquent adaptations Specifying general strain theory," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 89-101.
    7. Hay, Carter & Evans, Michelle M., 2006. "Violent victimization and involvement in delinquency: Examining predictions from general strain theory," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 261-274.
    8. Rebellon, Cesar J. & Manasse, Michelle E. & Van Gundy, Karen T. & Cohn, Ellen S., 2012. "Perceived injustice and delinquency: A test of general strain theory," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 230-237.
    9. Scheuerman, Heather L., 2013. "The relationship between injustice and crime: A general strain theory approach," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 41(6), pages 375-385.
    10. Warner, Barbara D. & Fowler, Shannon K., 2003. "Strain and violence: Testing a general strain theory model of community violence," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 511-521.
    11. Hollist, Dusten R. & Hughes, Lorine A. & Schaible, Lonnie M., 2009. "Adolescent maltreatment, negative emotion, and delinquency: An assessment of general strain theory and family-based strain," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 379-387, July.
    12. Jennings, Wesley G. & Piquero, Nicole L. & Gover, Angela R. & Pérez, Deanna M., 2009. "Gender and general strain theory: A replication and exploration of Broidy and Agnew's gender/strain hypothesis among a sample of southwestern Mexican American adolescents," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 404-417, July.
    13. Rebellon, Cesar J. & Piquero, Nicole Leeper & Piquero, Alex R. & Tibbetts, Stephen G., 2010. "Anticipated shaming and criminal offending," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 988-997, September.
    14. Capowich, George E. & Mazerolle, Paul & Piquero, Alex, 2001. "General strain theory, situational anger, and social networks: An assessment of conditioning influences," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 445-461.
    15. Stogner, John & Gibson, Chris L., 2010. "Healthy, wealthy, and wise: Incorporating health issues as a source of strain in Agnew's general strain theory," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 1150-1159, November.
    16. Kort-Butler, Lisa A., 2010. "Experienced and vicarious victimization: Do social support and self-esteem prevent delinquent responses?," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 496-505, July.
    17. Langton, Lynn & Piquero, Nicole Leeper, 2007. "Can general strain theory explain white-collar crime? A preliminary investigation of the relationship between strain and select white-collar offenses," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 1-15.
    18. Ousey, Graham C. & Wilcox, Pamela & Schreck, Christopher J., 2015. "Violent victimization, confluence of risks and the nature of criminal behavior: Testing main and interactive effects from Agnew’s extension of General Strain Theory," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 164-173.
    19. Jang, Sung Joon & Rhodes, Jeremy R., 2012. "General strain and non-strain theories: A study of crime in emerging adulthood," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 176-186.
    20. Baron, Stephen W., 2009. "Street youths' violent responses to violent personal, vicarious, and anticipated strain," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 442-451, September.
    21. Moon, Byongook & Hays, Kraig & Blurton, David, 2009. "General strain theory, key strains, and deviance," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 98-106, January.

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