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Information transmission and inefficient lobbying

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  • Lima, Rafael Costa
  • Moreira, Humberto

Abstract

In a seminal paper, Grossman and Helpman (1994) introduced a framework to understand how lobbying influences the choice of import/export tariffs. In this paper we extend their analysis and assume that lobbies have private information to analyze the effects of information transmission in a Grossman and Helpman lobby game. Information transmission leads to two agency costs. One refers to the cost of signaling and the other to the cost of screening the lobby's competitiveness. The signaling cost reduces distortions resulting from the screening cost. On the other hand, distortions from the screening cost enhance the signaling cost. The two combined effects generate more distortions in the political game than each effect separately. Tariff protection and lobbies' rents are lower than those found in Grossman and Helpman's truthful equilibrium. Therefore, information transmission may improve welfare through the reduction of rent-seeking activities.

Suggested Citation

  • Lima, Rafael Costa & Moreira, Humberto, 2014. "Information transmission and inefficient lobbying," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 282-307.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:gamebe:v:86:y:2014:i:c:p:282-307
    DOI: 10.1016/j.geb.2014.02.010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Antoine Bouet & David Laborde & David Martimort, 2014. "Two-Tier Asymmetric Information as a Motive for Trade, Trade Policies and Inefficient Trade Agreements," Working Papers hal-02149476, HAL.
    2. Roberti, Paolo, 2019. "Citizens or lobbies: Who controls policy?," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 497-514.
    3. Belloc, Marianna, 2015. "Information for sale in the European Union," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 130-144.
    4. Rafael Lima & Humberto Moreira & Thierry Verdier, 2008. "Lobbying and Information Transmission in Customs Unions," Working Papers 09_01, Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Economia, Administração e Contabilidade de Ribeirão Preto.
    5. Costa Lima, Rafael & Moreira, Humberto & Verdier, Thierry, 2012. "Centralized decision making against informed lobbying," CEPR Discussion Papers 9199, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Galperti, Simone, 2015. "Common agency with informed principals: Menus and signals," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 648-667.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Lobby; Asymmetric information; Common agency; Political economy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior

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