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A robustness result for rationalizable implementation

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  • Di Tillio, Alfredo

Abstract

This paper investigates the extent to which rationalizable implementation depends on the implicit common knowledge restrictions usually embodied in traditional models. It is shown that under fairly general conditions such restrictions are without loss of generality in the following sense: If a mechanism implements a social choice function f on a type space X, then implements f assuming only that the agents' k-order beliefs are among those described by an open set B containing X, while higher-order beliefs are completely unrestricted. The result is applied to direct implementation on payoff type spaces, and related to the weak (incentive compatible) implementation problem.

Suggested Citation

  • Di Tillio, Alfredo, 2011. "A robustness result for rationalizable implementation," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 301-305, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:gamebe:v:72:y:2011:i:1:p:301-305
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dirk Bergemann & Stephen Morris, 2005. "Robust Mechanism Design," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(6), pages 1771-1813, November.
    2. Georgy Artemov & Takashi Kunimoto & Roberto Serrano, 2007. "Robust Virtual Implementation with Incomplete Information: Toward a Reinterpretation of the Wilson Doctrine," Working Papers 2007-6, Brown University, Department of Economics.
    3. Dekel, Eddie & Fudenberg, Drew & Morris, Stephen, 2007. "Interim correlated rationalizability," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, pages 15-40.
    4. Marion Oury & Olivier Tercieux, 2012. "Continuous Implementation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 80(4), pages 1605-1637, July.
    5. Dirk Bergemann & Stephen Morris, 2009. "Robust Implementation in Direct Mechanisms," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 76(4), pages 1175-1204.
    6. Jonathan Weinstein & Muhamet Yildiz, 2007. "A Structure Theorem for Rationalizability with Application to Robust Predictions of Refinements," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 75(2), pages 365-400, March.
    7. Bergemann, Dirk & Morris, Stephen, 2009. "Robust virtual implementation," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 4(1), March.
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