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Liquidity constraints and occupational choice

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  • Giannetti, Mariassunta

Abstract

I show that liquidity constraints are related to individuals' occupational choice. A proxy for the prospect of becoming liquidity constrained affects negatively the probability of being self-employed as opposed to being employed in the private or the public sectors. Furthermore, individuals with higher probability of facing liquidity constraints are more likely to be employed in the public sector, which offers the highest level of job and income security, instead of being employed in the private sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Giannetti, Mariassunta, 2011. "Liquidity constraints and occupational choice," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 37-44, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:finlet:v:8:y:2011:i:1:p:37-44
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Guiso, Luigi & Jappelli, Tullio & Terlizzese, Daniele, 1996. "Income Risk, Borrowing Constraints, and Portfolio Choice," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(1), pages 158-172, March.
    2. Friebel, Guido & Giannetti, Mariassunta, 2002. "Fighting for Talent: Risk-Shifting, Corporate Volatility, and Organizational Change," CEPR Discussion Papers 3610, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Luigi Guiso & Paola Sapienza & Luigi Zingales, 2004. "Does Local Financial Development Matter?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(3), pages 929-969.
    4. Schivardi, Fabiano & Torrini, Roberto, 2008. "Identifying the effects of firing restrictions through size-contingent differences in regulation," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 482-511, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Caterina Giannetti & Marianna Madia & Luigi Moretti, 2014. "Job insecurity and financial distress," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(4), pages 219-233, February.
    2. Spiros Bougheas & Richard Upward, 2013. "Endogenous participation in imperfect labor and capital markets," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(4), pages 2454-2464.

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