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Socioeconomic conditions, health and mortality from birth to adulthood, Alghero 1866-1925

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Listed:
  • Breschi, M.
  • Fornasin, A.
  • Manfredini, M.
  • Mazzoni, S.
  • Pozzi, L.

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of socioeconomic conditions on health and mortality between birth and adulthood within the Sardinian community of Alghero, based on data from civil registers and military conscription lists for the period 1866-1925. Socioeconomic status does prove to have a significant effect on chances of survival especially in infancy and late childhood, although no clear trend in mortality differentials by SES emerges for the period studied. The determining role of SES in creating differentials in health status in early adulthood is much more evident.

Suggested Citation

  • Breschi, M. & Fornasin, A. & Manfredini, M. & Mazzoni, S. & Pozzi, L., 2011. "Socioeconomic conditions, health and mortality from birth to adulthood, Alghero 1866-1925," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(3), pages 366-375, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:exehis:v:48:y:2011:i:3:p:366-375
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christiaensen, Luc & Alderman, Harold, 2004. "Child Malnutrition in Ethiopia: Can Maternal Knowledge Augment the Role of Income?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(2), pages 287-312, January.
    2. Humphries, Jane & Leunig, Timothy, 2009. "Was Dick Whittington taller than those he left behind? Anthropometric measures, migration and the quality of life in early nineteenth century London?," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 120-131, January.
    3. Lavy, Victor & Strauss, John & Thomas, Duncan & de Vreyer, Philippe, 1996. "Quality of health care, survival and health outcomes in Ghana," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 333-357, June.
    4. Marco Breschi & Alessio Fornasin & Luciana Quaranta, 2006. "Heights of twenty years old males of Friuli (Italy) born between 1846 and 1890," Statistica, Department of Statistics, University of Bologna, vol. 66(4), pages 389-414.
    5. Paul Glewwe, 1999. "Why Does Mother's Schooling Raise Child Health in Developing Countries? Evidence from Morocco," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(1), pages 124-159.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bailey, Roy E. & Hatton, Timothy J. & Inwood, Kris, 2014. "Health, Height and the Household at the Turn of the 20th Century," IZA Discussion Papers 8128, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Bengtsson, Tommy & van Poppel, Frans, 2011. "Socioeconomic inequalities in death from past to present: An introduction," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(3), pages 343-356, July.

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