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Residential consumers in the Cape Peninsula's willingness to pay for premium priced green electricity

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  • Oliver, Henry
  • Volschenk, Jako
  • Smit, Eon

Abstract

A number of studies have explored the willingness (i.e. stated willingness as opposed to actual willingness) of consumers to pay a premium for green electricity in developed countries. However, little is known about how this translates into an emerging economy context. This study investigates the level of willingness of residential households in South Africa's Cape Peninsula to pay a premium for electricity from renewable energy. It methodologically drew on recent contributions in the literature on norm-motivated behaviour used to identify testable factors that could influence residential consumers' willingness to pay (WTP). Interestingly, the study found a significant positive link between household income and WTP for green electricity, contrary to the findings of some previous studies. Not only are higher income households more likely to pay a premium, but typically they are also willing to pay a bigger premium. It was also further established that the view that green electricity is reliable, involvement in the recycling of waste and the belief that everyone should contribute to green electricity generation drive the WTP.

Suggested Citation

  • Oliver, Henry & Volschenk, Jako & Smit, Eon, 2011. "Residential consumers in the Cape Peninsula's willingness to pay for premium priced green electricity," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 544-550, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:39:y:2011:i:2:p:544-550
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    References listed on IDEAS

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