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Analysing success of regulatory policy transfers: Evidence from Turkish energy markets

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  • Dastan, Seyit Ali

Abstract

Economic regulation of public utilities has become a worldwide phenomenon with the preceding privatisation stream. It is questionable to transfer regulatory models hastily without customising the policy options or introducing necessary institutional reforms enabling the achievement of expected results of regulatory reform. Institutional configuration of a country affects credibility of regulatory commitments, quality of regulatory design, and way of policy transfer. Turkey’s energy market regulation experience confirms the decisive role of institutions in shaping the regulatory framework.

Suggested Citation

  • Dastan, Seyit Ali, 2011. "Analysing success of regulatory policy transfers: Evidence from Turkish energy markets," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 8116-8124.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:39:y:2011:i:12:p:8116-8124
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2011.10.006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Mark Thatcher, 2007. "Regulatory Agencies, the State and Markets: A Franco-British Comparison," RSCAS Working Papers 2007/17, European University Institute.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dastan, Seyit Ali & Selcuk, Orhun, 2016. "Review of the security of supply in Turkish energy markets: Lessons from the winter shortages," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 958-971.
    2. repec:eee:enepol:v:109:y:2017:i:c:p:757-766 is not listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Regulation; Energy markets; Utilities;

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