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Carbon trading: Current schemes and future developments

Author

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  • Perdan, Slobodan
  • Azapagic, Adisa

Abstract

This paper looks at the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions trading schemes and examines the prospects of carbon trading. The first part of the paper gives an overview of several mandatory GHG trading schemes around the world. The second part focuses on the future trends in carbon trading. It argues that the emergence of new schemes, a gradual enlargement of the current ones, and willingness to link existing and planned schemes seem to point towards geographical, temporal and sectoral expansion of emissions trading. However, such expansion would need to overcome some considerable technical and non-technical obstacles. Linking of the current and emerging trading schemes requires not only considerable technical fixes and harmonisation of different trading systems, but also necessitates clear regulatory and policy signals, continuing political support and a more stable economic environment. Currently, the latter factors are missing. The global economic turmoil and its repercussions for the carbon market, a lack of the international deal on climate change defining the Post-Kyoto commitments, and unfavourable policy shifts in some countries, cast serious doubts on the expansion of emissions trading and indicate that carbon trading enters an uncertain period.

Suggested Citation

  • Perdan, Slobodan & Azapagic, Adisa, 2011. "Carbon trading: Current schemes and future developments," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 6040-6054, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:39:y:2011:i:10:p:6040-6054
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fankhauser, Samuel & Hepburn, Cameron, 2009. "Carbon markets in space and time," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 37606, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Michael Grubb & Karsten Neuhoff, 2006. "Allocation and competitiveness in the EU emissions trading scheme: policy overview," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(1), pages 7-30, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Auer, Benjamin R., 2016. "How does Germany's green energy policy affect electricity market volatility? An application of conditional autoregressive range models," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 621-628.
    2. Balint, T. & Lamperti, F. & Mandel, A. & Napoletano, M. & Roventini, A. & Sapio, A., 2017. "Complexity and the Economics of Climate Change: A Survey and a Look Forward," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 138(C), pages 252-265.
    3. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:11:p:2107-:d:119413 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Qi, Shaozhou & Wang, Banban & Zhang, Jihong, 2014. "Policy design of the Hubei ETS pilot in China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 31-38.
    5. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:11:p:2052-:d:118899 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Spash, Clive L. & Theine, Hendrik, 2016. "Voluntary Individual Carbon Trading," SRE-Discussion Papers 5206, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
      • Clive L. Spash & Hendrik Theine, 2016. "Voluntary Individual Carbon Trading," SRE-Disc sre-disc-2016_04, Institute for Multilevel Governance and Development, Department of Socioeconomics, Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    7. Bin Ye & Jingjing Jiang & Lixin Miao & Ji Li & Yang Peng, 2015. "Innovative Carbon Allowance Allocation Policy for the Shenzhen Emission Trading Scheme in China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(1), pages 1-23, December.
    8. repec:eee:ecolec:v:148:y:2018:i:c:p:170-177 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. repec:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2015:i:1:p:3:d:61052 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Hu, Guangyu & Rong, Ke & Shi, Yongjiang & Yu, Jing, 2014. "Sustaining the emerging carbon trading industry development: A business ecosystem approach of carbon traders," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 587-597.
    11. Jiang, Jing Jing & Ye, Bin & Ma, Xiao Ming, 2014. "The construction of Shenzhen׳s carbon emission trading scheme," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 17-21.
    12. Ari, İzzet, 2013. "Voluntary emission trading potential of Turkey," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 910-919.
    13. Jiang, Jingjing & Xie, Dejun & Ye, Bin & Shen, Bo & Chen, Zhanming, 2016. "Research on China’s cap-and-trade carbon emission trading scheme: Overview and outlook," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 178(C), pages 902-917.
    14. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:3:p:605-:d:133585 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Kamleshan Pillay & Jorge E. Viñuales, 2016. "“Monetary” rules for a linked system of offset credits," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 16(6), pages 933-951, December.

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