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Distributed small-scale wind in New Zealand: Advantages, barriers and policy support instruments

  • Barry, Martin
  • Chapman, Ralph
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    If future climate change goals being negotiated internationally are to have any chance of being achieved, developed countries need to undertake a major transition in their energy systems. This will require a rapid expansion of renewable energy generation, including wind electricity. Wind energy in New Zealand is commercially viable in many cases, yet opportunities for its exploitation are far from fully utilised. Many communities are showing resistance to wind farm developments, since large wind farms are often seen as intrusive. Building wind farms on a small scale may be a useful way of overcoming this problem. This study examines the pattern of recent wind industry development in New Zealand. It is argued that two key characteristics have emerged that are limiting the potential development of the industry: a trend towards large scale, leading to increased local opposition; and a small number of investors. Research methods include a review of international and local literature, and a rural mail survey questionnaire, with 338 respondents. We provide survey evidence that small wind farms, and community ownership of them, may be attractive to local communities, and that this point of advantage is helpful for the rapid expansion of wind generation in New Zealand.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V2W-4VP5XJB-1/2/cc22c36b17a14fc1d939beefc0ad5b55
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

    Volume (Year): 37 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 9 (September)
    Pages: 3358-3369

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:37:y:2009:i:9:p:3358-3369
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol

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    1. Jamil Khan, 2003. "Wind power planning in three Swedish municipalities," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(4), pages 563-581.
    2. Blanco, Mari­a Isabel & Rodrigues, Glória, 2008. "Can the future EU ETS support wind energy investments?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 1509-1520, April.
    3. Wang, Yan, 2006. "Renewable electricity in Sweden: an analysis of policy and regulations," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(10), pages 1209-1220, July.
    4. Wolsink, Maarten, 1996. "Dutch wind power policy : Stagnating implementation of renewables," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(12), pages 1079-1088, December.
    5. Krohn, Søren & Damborg, Steffen, 1999. "On public attitudes towards wind power," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 954-960.
    6. Mitchell, Catherine & Connor, Peter, 2004. "Renewable energy policy in the UK 1990-2003," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(17), pages 1935-1947, November.
    7. Lauber, Volkmar, 2004. "REFIT and RPS: options for a harmonised Community framework," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(12), pages 1405-1414, August.
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