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Why will dominant alternative transportation fuels be liquid fuels, not electricity or hydrogen?

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  • Zhao, Bin

Abstract

The nature of oil as a finite and non-renewable resource determines that the world oil production will eventually peak. Alternative fuels are energy to fill in the gap for transportation. The types of the alternative transportation fuels include electricity, gaseous, liquid, and solid energy carriers. Understanding what type of alternative fuels will dominate alternative transportation fuel market is critical for policy-makers to make sound decisions to develop alternative fuels. The purpose of the paper is to analyze the general trend of alternative fuel market by applying principles that govern the biological and technological evolutions. Existing transportation infrastructure favors liquid alternative fuels over electricity and hydrogen. The human nature of satisfying their needs with least effort also favors liquid fuels over electricity and hydrogen. And continuing supply of oil will reinforce existing transportation infrastructure, which will continue to make it impossible for electricity or hydrogen based transportation system to compete with current liquid fuel based transportation system economically.

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  • Zhao, Bin, 2017. "Why will dominant alternative transportation fuels be liquid fuels, not electricity or hydrogen?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 712-714.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:108:y:2017:i:c:p:712-714
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2017.06.047
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Saidi, Samir & Shahbaz, Muhammad & Akhtar, Pervaiz, 2018. "The long-run relationships between transport energy consumption, transport infrastructure, and economic growth in MENA countries," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 78-95.
    2. Katriina Sirviö & Seppo Niemi & Sonja Heikkilä & Jukka Kiijärvi & Michaela Hissa & Erkki Hiltunen, 2019. "Feasibility of New Liquid Fuel Blends for Medium-Speed Engines," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(14), pages 1-10, July.
    3. Drünert, Sebastian & Neuling, Ulf & Zitscher, Tjerk & Kaltschmitt, Martin, 2020. "Power-to-Liquid fuels for aviation – Processes, resources and supply potential under German conditions," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 277(C).
    4. John W. Day & Christopher F. D’Elia & Adrian R. H. Wiegman & Jeffrey S. Rutherford & Charles A. S. Hall & Robert R. Lane & David E. Dismukes, 2018. "The Energy Pillars of Society: Perverse Interactions of Human Resource Use, the Economy, and Environmental Degradation," Biophysical Economics and Resource Quality, Springer, vol. 3(1), pages 1-16, March.
    5. Samir, Saidi & Shahbaz, Muhammad & Akhtar, Pervaiz, 2018. "The Long-Run Relationship between Transport Energy Consumption and Transport Infrastructure on Economic Growth in MENA Countries," MPRA Paper 85037, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 06 Mar 2018.
    6. Hansen, Samuel & Mirkouei, Amin & Diaz, Luis A., 2020. "A comprehensive state-of-technology review for upgrading bio-oil to renewable or blended hydrocarbon fuels," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 118(C).
    7. Gegg, Per & Wells, Victoria, 2019. "The development of seaweed-derived fuels in the UK: An analysis of stakeholder issues and public perceptions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 133(C).

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