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Height and BMI values of German conscripts in 2000, 2001 and 1906

  • Hiermeyer, Martin

We examine the height and weight of 320,000 German 18-22-year-old conscripts born between 1979 and 1982. We show that height and BMI outcomes are associated with the socio-economic status of a person. For example, we find a positive correlation between education and height and a negative one between education and BMI. A West-East and a North-South gradient in both height and BMI is found. Today, West German recruits are about 5.5Â cm taller than their peers 43 years ago and about 12.5Â cm taller than those 100 years ago, reflecting a substantial improvement in the biological standard of living. To this day, however, individuals of high socio-economic status reach an above-average height.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics & Human Biology.

Volume (Year): 7 (2009)
Issue (Month): 3 (December)
Pages: 366-375

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:7:y:2009:i:3:p:366-375
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