IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/ehbiol/v6y2008i3p398-419.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Using graphical chain models to analyze differences in structural correlates of undernutrition in Benin and Bangladesh

Author

Listed:
  • Foraita, Ronja
  • Klasen, Stephan
  • Pigeot, Iris

Abstract

Undernutrition among children is one of the most important health problems in developing countries. In order to understand the complex pathways affecting undernutrition which is crucial for policy interventions, one needs to explicitly model the dependence chain of immediate, intermediate, and underlying factors affecting undernutrition. Graphical chain models are used here to investigate the determinants of undernutrition in Benin and Bangladesh. While the dependence chain affecting undernutrition contains many common elements, the influence of demographic, cultural, and socioeconomic factors seems to have stronger direct and indirect influences in Benin than in Bangladesh, where many socioeconomic and gender related factors have a more direct influence on undernutrition.

Suggested Citation

  • Foraita, Ronja & Klasen, Stephan & Pigeot, Iris, 2008. "Using graphical chain models to analyze differences in structural correlates of undernutrition in Benin and Bangladesh," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 398-419, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:6:y:2008:i:3:p:398-419
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1570-677X(08)00053-1
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Behrman, Jere R. & Skoufias, Emmanuel, 2004. "Correlates and determinants of child anthropometrics in Latin America: background and overview of the symposium," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 335-351, December.
    2. Stephan Klasen, 2006. "Pro-Poor Growth and Gender Inequality," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 151, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Guilkey, David K. & Riphahn, Regina T., 1998. "The determinants of child mortality in the Philippines: estimation of a structural model," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 281-305, August.
    4. Kenneth Harttgen & Mark Misselhorn, 2006. "A Multilevel Approach to Explain Child Mortality and Undernutrition in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 152, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.
    5. Smith, Lisa C. & Haddad, Lawrence James, 2000. "Explaining child malnutrition in developing countries: a cross-country analysis," Research reports 111, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. de Haen, Hartwig & Klasen, Stephan & Qaim, Matin, 2011. "What do we really know? Metrics for food insecurity and undernutrition," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 760-769.
    2. Nguefack-Tsague, Georges & Dapi N., Léonie, 2011. "Multidimensional Nature of Undernutrition: A Statistical Approach," MPRA Paper 29246, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Atsbeha, Daniel Muluwork & Nayga, Rodolfo M. & Rickertsen, Kyrre, 2015. "Can prolonged breastfeeding duration impair child growth? Evidence from rural Ethiopia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 46-53.
    4. Maria Carmela Lo Bue, 2014. "What drives child health improvements in Indonesian households? A micro-level perspective on complementarities in MDG achievements," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 155, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    5. Demombynes, Gabriel & Trommlerová, Sofia Karina, 2016. "What has driven the decline of infant mortality in Kenya in the 2000s?," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 17-32.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:6:y:2008:i:3:p:398-419. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622964 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.