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Stroke-attributable death among older persons during the great recession

Author

Listed:
  • Falconi, April
  • Gemmill, Alison
  • Karasek, Deborah
  • Goodman, Julia
  • Anderson, Beth
  • Lee, Murray
  • Bellows, Benjamin
  • Catalano, Ralph

Abstract

Epidemiological evidence indicates an elevated risk for stroke among stressed persons, in general, and among individuals who have lost their job, in particular. We, therefore, tested the hypothesis that stroke accounted for a larger fraction of deaths during the Great Recession than expected from other deaths and from trends, cycles, and other forms of autocorrelation. Based on vital statistics death data from California spanning 132 months from January 2000 through December 2010, we found support for the hypothesis. These findings appear attributable to non-Hispanic white men, who experienced a 5% increase in their monthly odds of stroke-attributable death. Total mortality in this group, however, did not increase. Findings suggest that 879 deaths among older white men shifted from other causes to stroke during the 36 months following the start of the Great Recession. We infer the Great Recession may have affected social, biologic, and behavioral risk factors that altered the life histories of older white men in ways that shifted mortality risk toward stroke.

Suggested Citation

  • Falconi, April & Gemmill, Alison & Karasek, Deborah & Goodman, Julia & Anderson, Beth & Lee, Murray & Bellows, Benjamin & Catalano, Ralph, 2016. "Stroke-attributable death among older persons during the great recession," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 56-63.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:21:y:2016:i:c:p:56-63
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ehb.2015.11.005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Ruhm, Christopher J., 2006. "Deaths rise in good economic times: Evidence from the OECD," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 298-316, December.
    2. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1979:69:8:789-794_9 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Hilary Hoynes & Douglas L. Miller & Jessamyn Schaller, 2012. "Who Suffers during Recessions?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 26(3), pages 27-48, Summer.
    4. Daniel Sullivan & Till von Wachter, 2009. "Job Displacement and Mortality: An Analysis Using Administrative Data," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(3), pages 1265-1306.
    5. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521285865 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Wang, Huixia & Wang, Chenggang & Halliday, Timothy J., 2018. "Health and health inequality during the great recession: Evidence from the PSID," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 17-30.
    2. Chenggang Wang & Huixia Wang & Timothy J. Halliday, 2017. "Health and Health Inequality during the Great Recession: Evidence from the PSID," Working Papers 201703, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    3. repec:eee:ehbiol:v:31:y:2018:i:c:p:249-258 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:dem:demres:v:37:y:2017:i:25 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Stroke; Mortality; Great recession;

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