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Consumer credit on American Indian reservations

Author

Listed:
  • Dimitrova-Grajzl, Valentina
  • Grajzl, Peter
  • Guse, A. Joseph
  • Todd, Richard M.

Abstract

This paper provides the first encompassing quantitative picture of consumer credit in Indian Country. Drawing on a unique large-scale consumer credit database, we find that Equifax Risk Scores and the use of certain forms of credit, especially mortgages, are low on reservations. However, usage of other forms of credit on reservations is not always low. Moreover, the gaps in credit usage on versus off reservations differ significantly across states and can change notably over time. Among predictors of consumer credit outcomes, the percentage of American Indian residents is robustly negatively associated with favorable credit outcomes. Furthermore, once controlling for racial composition, the effect of an area's location vis-à-vis a reservation often becomes statistically insignificant. Other socio-economic variables are generally poor predictors of credit outcomes on reservations. State jurisdiction over legal matters is, at least on average, associated with favorable credit outcomes on reservations.

Suggested Citation

  • Dimitrova-Grajzl, Valentina & Grajzl, Peter & Guse, A. Joseph & Todd, Richard M., 2015. "Consumer credit on American Indian reservations," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 518-540.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecosys:v:39:y:2015:i:3:p:518-540
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ecosys.2015.01.005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Terry L. Anderson & Dominic P. Parker, 2008. "Sovereignty, Credible Commitments, and Economic Prosperity on American Indian Reservations," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 51(4), pages 641-666, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Randall Akee & Elton Mykerezi & Richard M. Todd, 2017. "Reservation Employer Establishments: Data from the U.S. Census Longitudinal Business Database," Working Papers 17-57, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    2. Brown, James R. & Cookson, J Anthony & Heimer, Rawley, 2014. "Legal Institutions, Credit Markets, and Economic Activity," Working Paper 1434, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    3. Valentina Dimitrova-Grajzl & Peter Grajzl & A. Joseph Guse & Richard M. Todd & Michael Williams, 2015. "Neighborhood Racial Characteristics, Credit History, and Bankcard Credit in Indian Country," CESifo Working Paper Series 5594, CESifo Group Munich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    American Indian reservations; Consumer credit; Credit conditions; Credit usage;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • P43 - Economic Systems - - Other Economic Systems - - - Finance; Public Finance
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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