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Trade openness and government size

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  • Benarroch, Michael
  • Pandey, Manish

Abstract

We examine whether trade openness influences government size. Using panel data, we find no evidence of a positive relationship. Rather, causality tests show that larger government size leads to lower openness, the opposite of what Rodrik [Rodrik, Dani, 1998, Why do more open economies have bigger governments? Journal of Political Economy 106, 997-1032.] hypothesized.

Suggested Citation

  • Benarroch, Michael & Pandey, Manish, 2008. "Trade openness and government size," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 101(3), pages 157-159, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:101:y:2008:i:3:p:157-159
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tom Krebs & Pravin Krishna & William Maloney, 2010. "Trade Policy, Income Risk, and Welfare," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 92(3), pages 467-481, August.
    2. repec:cup:apsrev:v:72:y:1978:i:04:p:1243-1261_15 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Hassan Molana & Catia Montagna & Mara Violato, 2004. "On the Causal Relationship between Trade Openness and Government Size: Evidence from 23 OECD Countries," Dundee Discussion Papers in Economics 164, Economic Studies, University of Dundee.
    4. Dani Rodrik, 1998. "Why Do More Open Economies Have Bigger Governments?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(5), pages 997-1032, October.
    5. Alesina, Alberto & Wacziarg, Romain, 1998. "Openness, country size and government," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(3), pages 305-321, September.
    6. Garen, John & Trask, Kathleen, 2005. "Do more open economies have bigger governments? Another look," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 533-551, August.
    7. Muhammad Islam, 2004. "The long run relationship between openness and government size: evidence from bounds test," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(9), pages 995-1000.
    8. Elena Podrecca & Gaetano Carmeci, 2001. "Fixed investment and economic growth: new results on causality," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(2), pages 177-182.
    9. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
    10. Nazrul Islam, 1995. "Growth Empirics: A Panel Data Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 1127-1170.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Paulo Reis Mourão, 2011. "Has Trade Openness Already Voted? A Panel Data Study," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 47(0), pages 53-71, November.
    2. Rene Cabral Torres, 2012. "Capital and Labor Mobility and the Size of Sub-national Governments: Evidence from a Panel of Mexican States," CID Working Papers 231, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    3. Escobari Diego & Mollick André Varella, 2013. "Output growth and unexpected government expenditures," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 13(1), pages 1-33, September.
    4. repec:etr:series:v:9:y:2018:i:1:p:012-021 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Bournakis, Ioannis & Tsoukis, Christopher, 2016. "Government size, institutions, and export performance among OECD economies," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 37-47.
    6. Jetter, Michael & Parmeter, Christopher F., 2015. "Trade openness and bigger governments: The role of country size revisited," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 49-63.
    7. Dierk Herzer, 2017. "The Long-run Relationship Between Trade and Population Health: Evidence from Five Decades," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(2), pages 462-487, February.
    8. Muhammad Zakaria & Samreen Shakoor, 2011. "Relationship Between Government Size and Trade Openness: Evidence from Pakistan," Transition Studies Review, Springer;Central Eastern European University Network (CEEUN), vol. 18(2), pages 328-341, December.
    9. Romain Espinosa, 2016. "State provision of constitutional goods," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 1-40, March.
    10. Alena Kimakova, 2009. "Government size and openness revisited: the case of financial globalization," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(3), pages 394-406, August.
    11. Estela Sáenz & Marcela Sabaté & M. Gadea, 2013. "Trade openness and public expenditure. The Spanish case, 1960–2000," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 154(3), pages 173-195, March.
    12. Estela Sáenz Rodríguez & Marcela Sabaté Sort & Mª. Dolores Gadea Rivas, 2011. "¿Condiciona la apertura exterior el tamaño del sector público? Un panorama," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 198(3), pages 131-149, September.
    13. repec:bla:worlde:v:40:y:2017:i:6:p:1247-1263 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Thushyanthan Baskaran & Zohal Hessami, 2010. "Globalization, Redistribution, and the Composition of Public Education Expenditures," CESifo Working Paper Series 2917, CESifo Group Munich.
    15. Romain Espinosa, 2016. "State provision of constitutional goods," Post-Print halshs-01634210, HAL.
    16. Benarroch, Michael & Pandey, Manish, 2012. "The relationship between trade openness and government size: Does disaggregating government expenditure matter?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 239-252.

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