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International Trade and Energy Intensity During European Industrialization, 1870–1935

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  • Kander, Astrid
  • Warde, Paul
  • Teives Henriques, Sofia
  • Nielsen, Hana
  • Kulionis, Viktoras
  • Hagen, Sven

Abstract

Previous research suggests that there is an inverted U-shape curve for energy intensity in the long-run for Western Europe with a peak in the early 20th century. This paper tests the hypothesis that the increase of German and British energy intensity was an effect from the concentration of heavy industrial production to these countries, although the consumption of a significant share of these goods took place elsewhere. We use an entirely new database that we have constructed (TEG: Trade, Energy, Growth) to test whether these countries exported more energy-demanding goods than they imported, thus providing other countries with means to industrialize and to consume cheap-energy demanding goods.

Suggested Citation

  • Kander, Astrid & Warde, Paul & Teives Henriques, Sofia & Nielsen, Hana & Kulionis, Viktoras & Hagen, Sven, 2017. "International Trade and Energy Intensity During European Industrialization, 1870–1935," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 139(C), pages 33-44.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:139:y:2017:i:c:p:33-44
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2017.03.042
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    Cited by:

    1. Christopher Kennedy, 2020. "The energy embodied in the first and second industrial revolutions," Journal of Industrial Ecology, Yale University, vol. 24(4), pages 887-898, August.
    2. Teives Henriques, Sofia & Sharp, Paul, 2018. "Without coal in the age of steam and dams in the age of electricity: An explanation for the failure of Portugal to industrialize before the Second World War," Lund Papers in Economic History 185, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    3. Nielsen, Hana & Warde, Paul & Kander, Astrid, 2018. "East versus West: Energy intensity in coal-rich Europe, 1800–2000," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 122(C), pages 75-83.
    4. Magalhães, Nelo & Fressoz, Jean-Baptiste & Jarrige, François & Le Roux, Thomas & Levillain, Gaëtan & Lyautey, Margot & Noblet, Guillaume & Bonneuil, Christophe, 2019. "The Physical Economy of France (1830–2015). The History of a Parasite?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 291-300.
    5. Paolo Malanima, 2020. "The limiting factor: energy, growth, and divergence, 1820–1913," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 73(2), pages 486-512, May.
    6. Krausmann, Fridolin & Langthaler, Ernst, 2019. "Food regimes and their trade links: A socio-ecological perspective," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 160(C), pages 87-95.
    7. Hana Nielsen, 2018. "Industrial Intensification and Energy Embodied in Trade: Long‐Run Energy Perspective of the Planned Economy of Czechoslovakia," Journal of Industrial Ecology, Yale University, vol. 22(6), pages 1436-1450, December.
    8. Infante-Amate, Juan & Aguilera, Eduardo & Palmeri, Francesco & Guzmán, Gloria & Soto, David & García-Ruiz, Roberto & de Molina, Manuel González, 2018. "Land embodied in Spain’s biomass trade and consumption (1900–2008): Historical changes, drivers and impacts," Land Use Policy, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 493-502.
    9. Kristin Ranestad & Paul Richard Sharp, 2020. "Success through failure? Four Centuries of Searching for Danish Coal," Working Papers 0183, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    10. Infante-Amate, Juan & Krausmann, Fridolin, 2019. "Trade, Ecologically Unequal Exchange and Colonial Legacy: The Case of France and its Former Colonies (1962–2015)," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 156(C), pages 98-109.

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