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Asymmetries in progression in higher education in Taiwan: Parental education and income effects

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  • Liu, Jin-Tan
  • Chou, Shin-Yi
  • Liu, Jin-Long

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  • Liu, Jin-Tan & Chou, Shin-Yi & Liu, Jin-Long, 2006. "Asymmetries in progression in higher education in Taiwan: Parental education and income effects," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 647-658, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:25:y:2006:i:6:p:647-658
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Liu, Jin-Tan & Hammitt, James K. & Jeng Lin, Chyongchiou, 1999. "Family background and returns to schooling in Taiwan," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, pages 113-125.
    2. Angus Deaton, 2003. "Health, Inequality, and Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 41(1), pages 113-158, March.
    3. Corman, Hope & Chaikind, Stephen, 1998. "The effect of low birthweight on the school performance and behavior of school-aged children," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, pages 307-316.
    4. William L. Parish & Robert J. Willis, 1993. "Daughters, Education, and Family Budgets Taiwan Experiences," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, pages 863-898.
    5. Gonzalez Rozada, Martin & Menendez, Alicia, 2002. "Public university in Argentina: subsidizing the rich?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, pages 341-351.
    6. Leung, Siu Fai & Yu, Shihti, 1996. "On the choice between sample selection and two-part models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, pages 197-229.
    7. Robert Haveman & Barbara Wolfe, 1995. "The Determinants of Children's Attainments: A Review of Methods and Findings," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, pages 1829-1878.
    8. Duan, Naihua, et al, 1983. "A Comparison of Alternative Models for the Demand for Medical Care," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 1(2), pages 115-126, April.
    9. Rosemary Hyson & Janet Currie, 1999. "Is the Impact of Health Shocks Cushioned by Socioeconomic Status? The Case of Low Birthweight," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 245-250.
    10. Behrman, Jere R., 1999. "Labor markets in developing countries," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 43, pages 2859-2939 Elsevier.
    11. William L. Parish & Robert J. Willis, 1993. "Daughters, Education, and Family Budgets Taiwan Experiences," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, pages 863-898.
    12. Leung, Siu Fai & Yu, Shihti, 1996. "On the choice between sample selection and two-part models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1-2), pages 197-229.
    13. Raquel Fernandez & Richard Rogerson, 1995. "On the Political Economy of Education Subsidies," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 62(2), pages 249-262.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ben-Halima, B. & Chusseau, N. & Hellier, J., 2014. "Skill premia and intergenerational education mobility: The French case," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, pages 50-64.
    2. Caner, Asena & Okten, Cagla, 2010. "Risk and career choice: Evidence from Turkey," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 1060-1075, December.
    3. Caner, Asena & Okten, Cagla, 2013. "Higher education in Turkey: Subsidizing the rich or the poor?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, pages 75-92.
    4. Brunori, Paolo & Ferreira, Francisco H. G. & Peragine, Vito, 2013. "Inequality of opportunity, income inequality and economic mobility : some international comparisons," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6304, The World Bank.
    5. Elise S. Brezis & Joël Hellier, 2013. "Social Mobility at the Top: Why Are Elites Self-Reproducing?," Working Papers 2013-12, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.
    6. Maria Eduarda Tannuri Pianto & Andrew Francis, 2011. "The Redistributive Efficacy Ofaffirmative Action: Exploring The Role Of Race And Socioeconomic Statusin College Admissions," Anais do XXXVIII Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 38th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 218, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pósgraduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    7. Polat, Sezgin, 2016. "Some Economic Consequences of Higher Education Expansion in Turkey," MPRA Paper 72602, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Francis, Andrew M. & Tannuri-Pianto, Maria, 2012. "The redistributive equity of affirmative action: Exploring the role of race, socioeconomic status, and gender in college admissions," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, pages 45-55.

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