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Imperfect competition, general equilibrium and unemployment

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  • Gersbach, Hans
  • Schniewind, Achim

Abstract

We analyze whether different learning abilities of firms with respect to general equilibrium effects lead to different levels of unemployment. We consider a general equilibrium model, where firms in one sector compete a la Cournot and a real wage rigidity leads to unemployment. If firms consider only partial equilibrium effects when choosing quantities, the observation of general equilibrium feedback effects will lead to repeated quantity adjustments until a steady state is reached. When labor is mobile across industries, unemployment in the steady state is higher than when all general equilibrium effects are incorporated at once. The opposite result is true if labor is immobile.

Suggested Citation

  • Gersbach, Hans & Schniewind, Achim, 2008. "Imperfect competition, general equilibrium and unemployment," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 1381-1398, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:32:y:2008:i:5:p:1381-1398
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    1. Jaskold Gabszewicz, Jean & Vial, Jean-Philippe, 1972. "Oligopoly "A la cournot" in a general equilibrium analysis," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 381-400, June.
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    6. Markusen, James R., 1981. "Trade and the gains from trade with imperfect competition," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 531-551, November.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D58 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Computable and Other Applied General Equilibrium Models
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General
    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets

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