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A theory of development and long run growth

  • Kosempel, Stephen

This paper presents a synthesized theory of development and long run growth. The theory that is presented combines two engines of growth which have been emphasized in the literature: technological progress and human capital accumulation. In the model, the growth rate of per capita output depends in part on the interaction between these two types of economic forces.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Development Economics.

Volume (Year): 75 (2004)
Issue (Month): 1 (October)
Pages: 201-220

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Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:75:y:2004:i:1:p:201-220
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/devec

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  2. Robert J. Barro & Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 1991. "Convergence across States and Regions," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 22(1), pages 107-182.
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  5. Stokey, Nancy L, 1988. "Learning by Doing and the Introduction of New Goods," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(4), pages 701-17, August.
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  8. Stephen Kosempel & Kenneth Carlaw, 2003. "Accounting For Canada¡¯S Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 28(2), pages 83-101, December.
  9. Sergio T. Rebelo, 1990. "Long Run Policy Analysis and Long Run Growth," NBER Working Papers 3325, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  12. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-37, October.
  13. Barro, R.J. & Sala-I-Martin, X., 1991. "Convergence," Papers 645, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
  14. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1990. "Why Doesn't Capital Flow from Rich to Poor Countries?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 92-96, May.
  15. Paul M Romer, 1999. "Endogenous Technological Change," Levine's Working Paper Archive 2135, David K. Levine.
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  17. Grossman, Gene M & Helpman, Elhanan, 1991. "Quality Ladders in the Theory of Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(1), pages 43-61, January.
  18. Islam, Nazrul, 1995. "Growth Empirics: A Panel Data Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 110(4), pages 1127-70, November.
  19. Eicher, Theo S, 1996. "Interaction between Endogenous Human Capital and Technological Change," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(1), pages 127-44, January.
  20. Parente Stephen L., 1994. "Technology Adoption, Learning-by-Doing, and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 346-369, August.
  21. Carlaw, K. & Kosempel, S., 2001. "Accounting for Canada's Economic Growth: A GE Approach," Working Papers 2001-1, University of Guelph, Department of Economics and Finance.
  22. Oded Galor & Omer Moav, 1998. "Ability Biased Technological Transition, Wage Inequality, and Economic Growth," Working Papers 98-14, Brown University, Department of Economics.
  23. Lloyd-Ellis, Huw & Roberts, Joanne, 2002. " Twin Engines of Growth: Skills and Technology as Equal Partners in Balanced Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 87-115, June.
  24. Aghion, Philippe & Howitt, Peter, 1992. "A Model of Growth Through Creative Destruction," Scholarly Articles 12490578, Harvard University Department of Economics.
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