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School-age special education outcomes of infants and toddlers investigated for maltreatment

  • Scarborough, Anita A.
  • McCrae, Julie S.
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    Examination of a nationally representative, longitudinal study of infants and toddlers investigated for maltreatment reveals disproportionate representation of teen mothers, fair/poor health, poverty, and being African-American. Infants are more likely to have special needs reported, subst`ance abusing caregivers, low-quality home environment, out-of-home placement, physical neglect, and substantiated maltreatment. At school-age, approximately one-fifth of all investigated infants and toddlers have an Individualized Education Program (IEP), indicating special education placement. Early characteristics associated with having an IEP include poverty, boys, fair/poor health, and low language scores. Hispanic children and those investigated for physical or sexual abuse were less likely to have an IEP. At school-age, infants had lower Woodcock-Johnson-III math subtests scores, whereas toddlers had lower reading comprehension performance.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V98-4WSRDT2-1/2/97324c457b0cb0e0298774a6d055ab5a
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Children and Youth Services Review.

    Volume (Year): 32 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 80-88

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:32:y:2010:i:1:p:80-88
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/childyouth

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    1. Magura, Stephen & Laudet, Alexandre B., 1996. "Parental substance abuse and child maltreatment: Review and implications for intervention," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 193-220.
    2. Christina Paxson & Jane Waldfogel, 1999. "Work, Welfare, and Child Maltreatment," Working Papers 278, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing..
    3. Wolock, Isabel & Sherman, Patricia & Feldman, Leonard H. & Metzger, Barbara, 2001. "Child abuse and neglect referral patterns: A longitudinal study," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 21-47, January.
    4. S. Illeris & G. Akehurst, 2002. "Introduction," The Service Industries Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(1), pages 1-3, January.
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