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The economics of climate change in Latin America and the Caribbean: stylized facts

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  • Galindo, Luis Miguel
  • Samaniego, Joseluis

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  • Galindo, Luis Miguel & Samaniego, Joseluis, 2010. "The economics of climate change in Latin America and the Caribbean: stylized facts," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecr:col070:11495
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    1. González, Andrés & Teräsvirta, Timo & van Dijk, Dick & Yang, Yukai, 2005. "Panel Smooth Transition Regression Models," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 604, Stockholm School of Economics, revised 11 Oct 2017.
    2. Cameron Hepburn & Nicholas Stern, 2008. "A new global deal on climate change," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(2), pages 259-279, Summer.
    3. Campbell,Harry F. & Brown,Richard P. C., 2003. "Benefit-Cost Analysis," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521528986.
    4. Stern,Nicholas, 2007. "The Economics of Climate Change," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521700801.
    5. G. Destais & Julien Fouquau & C. Hurlin, 2006. "Economic Development and Energy Intensity: a Panel Data Analysis," Post-Print halshs-00222798, HAL.
    6. John, A & Pecchenino, R, 1994. "An Overlapping Generations Model of Growth and the Environment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(427), pages 1393-1410, November.
    7. Richard Tol, 2002. "Estimates of the Damage Costs of Climate Change. Part 1: Benchmark Estimates," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 21(1), pages 47-73, January.
    8. Ang, B. W., 1987. "A cross-sectional analysis of energy--output correlation," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 274-286, October.
    9. Richard Tol, 2002. "Estimates of the Damage Costs of Climate Change, Part II. Dynamic Estimates," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 21(2), pages 135-160, February.
    10. Selden Thomas M. & Song Daqing, 1994. "Environmental Quality and Development: Is There a Kuznets Curve for Air Pollution Emissions?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 147-162, September.
    11. Jeffrey M Wooldridge, 2010. "Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262232588, September.
    12. Zilberfarb, Ben-Zion & Adams, F. Gerard, 1981. "The energy-GDP relationship in developing countries : Empirical evidence and stability tests," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 244-248, October.
    13. Johansson,Per-Olov, 1993. "Cost-Benefit Analysis of Environmental Change," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521447928.
    14. Olivier Jean Blanchard & Stanley Fischer, 1989. "Lectures on Macroeconomics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262022834, September.
    15. Shrestha, Ram M., 2000. "Estimation of international output-energy relation: effects of alternative output measures," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 297-308, June.
    16. Datt, Gaurav & Ravallion, Martin, 1992. "Growth and redistribution components of changes in poverty measures : A decomposition with applications to Brazil and India in the 1980s," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 275-295, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marmai, Nadin & Franco Villoria, Maria & Guerzoni, Marco, 2016. "How the Black Swan damages the harvest: statistical modelling of extreme events in weather and crop production in Africa, Asia, and Latin America," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis LEI & BRICK - Laboratory of Economics of Innovation "Franco Momigliano", Bureau of Research in Innovation, Complexity and Knowledge, Collegio 201605, University of Turin.
    2. Daniela Aguilar Abaunza, 2017. "The Role of Renewable Energy in Meeting the Climate Change Targets in Brazil and Colombia," Books, Universidad Externado de Colombia, Facultad de Derecho, number 904, January.
    3. Ching-Hsien Ho & Huu-Sheng Lur & Ming-Hwi Yao & Fang-Ching Liao & Ying-Ting Lin & Nobuyuki Yagi & Hsueh-Jung Lu, 2018. "The impact on food security and future adaptation under climate variation: a case study of Taiwan’s agriculture and fisheries," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 311-347, March.
    4. Figueroa, Adolfo, 2013. "Economic growth and the environment," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), April.

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