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Analysis of CO2 Emission and Economic Growth as Potential Determinants of Renewable Energy Demand in Nigeria: A Nonlinear Autoregressive Distributed Lags Approach

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  • Bernard Olagboyega Muse

    (Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Rufus Giwa Polytechnic, P.M.B 1019, Owo, Ondo state, Nigeria.)

Abstract

Concerned by the environmental and economic threats posed by fossil fuels as the source of energy, this study uses the case of Nigeria economy to understand the extent to which economic growth and carbon emissions matters for renewable energy demands. Exploring both the linear and nonlinear ARDL modelling framework, the main empirical findings are that the amplified responsiveness of the consequence of climate change has led to increase in the demand for renewable energy particularly when the underlying source of the emissions is attributable to activities in the transport sector. However, in addition to our findings of oil prices as viable for explaining renewable energy demand, this study further pointed out the economic growth as another potential for explaining renewable energy demand but vary for the boom and recession phases of the business cycle.

Suggested Citation

  • Bernard Olagboyega Muse, 2021. "Analysis of CO2 Emission and Economic Growth as Potential Determinants of Renewable Energy Demand in Nigeria: A Nonlinear Autoregressive Distributed Lags Approach," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 11(3), pages 510-516.
  • Handle: RePEc:eco:journ2:2021-03-62
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Renewable energy demand; CO 2 emission; economic growth; nonlinear ARDL; Nigeria;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • F64 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Environment
    • Q21 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling

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