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Malthusian Population Oscillations


  • Lee, Maw Lin
  • Loschky, David


Usual Malthusian population models conform to Malthus's summary statement but not to the full argument developed in his extensive historical survey. This expanded model includes oscillations in population growth, interdep endency between the preventive and positive checks and other factors. The model's parameters, estimated using the recently published Wrigl ey and Schofield English population data, support Malthus. The model, which yields oscillations in both population growth rates and real w ages, should prove to be a useful tool with which to explore England' s economic-demographic history. Moreover, studies in the history of t hought should be enriched by integrating his population and economic theories. Copyright 1987 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Lee, Maw Lin & Loschky, David, 1987. "Malthusian Population Oscillations," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 97(387), pages 727-739, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:97:y:1987:i:387:p:727-39

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Lindert, Peter H., 1983. "English living standards, population growth, and Wrigley-Schofield," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 131-155, April.
    2. Olney, Martha L., 1983. "Fertility and the Standard of Living in Early Modern England: in Consideration of Wrigley and Schofield," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 43(01), pages 71-77, March.
    3. Costabile, Lilia & Rowthorn, Bob, 1985. "Malthus's Theory of Wages and Growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 95(378), pages 418-437, June.
    4. Loschky, David J. & Krier, Donald F., 1969. "Income and Family Size in Three Eighteenth-Century Lancashire Parishes: A Reconstitution Study," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 29(03), pages 429-448, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Carl-Johan Dalgaard & Holger Strulik, 2015. "The physiological foundations of the wealth of nations," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 20(1), pages 37-73, March.
    2. Niels Møller & Paul Sharp, 2014. "Malthus in cointegration space: evidence of a post-Malthusian pre-industrial England," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 105-140, March.

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