IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ecj/econjl/v104y1994i423p372-85.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Formation of Price and Cost Inflation Expectations in British Manufacturing Industries: A Multi-Sectoral Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Lee, Kevin C

Abstract

The process by which agents form expectations on price and cost inflation is investigated. Measures of expectations of these series, derived from qualitative survey responses in nine industrial sectors covering U.K. manufacturing between 1972 and 1989, are described, and the rationality of these expectations tested. Rationality is not rejected in many sectors and the evidence against rationality much weakened in other sectors, if tests take into account a particular form of conversion error. The possible effect of aggregation bias in the tests is noted, as rationality is rejected with more confidence with aggregated data than when the sectoral data is considered individually. Copyright 1994 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Lee, Kevin C, 1994. "Formation of Price and Cost Inflation Expectations in British Manufacturing Industries: A Multi-Sectoral Analysis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(423), pages 372-385, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:104:y:1994:i:423:p:372-85
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0013-0133%28199403%29104%3A423%3C372%3AFOPACI%3E2.0.CO%3B2-8&origin=bc
    File Function: full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to JSTOR subscribers. See http://www.jstor.org for details.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Lui, Silvia & Mitchell, James & Weale, Martin, 2011. "The utility of expectational data: Firm-level evidence using matched qualitative-quantitative UK surveys," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 1128-1146, October.
    2. Jan Marc Berk, 2002. "Consumers' Inflation Expectations And Monetary Policy In Europe," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 20(2), pages 122-132, April.
    3. Mitchell, James, 2002. "The use of non-normal distributions in quantifying qualitative survey data on expectations," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 76(1), pages 101-107, June.
    4. Tobias F. Rötheli, 1999. "Selling prices and profits: what survey data tell about firms' rationality," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(6), pages 319-325.
    5. Yusuf Soner Baskaya & Hakan Kara & Defne Mutluer, 2008. "Expectations, Communication and Monetary Policy in Turkey," Working Papers 0801, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey.
    6. Oscar Claveria & Enric Monte & Salvador Torra, 2018. "“Tracking economic growth by evolving expectations via genetic programming: A two-step approach”," AQR Working Papers 201801, University of Barcelona, Regional Quantitative Analysis Group, revised Jan 2018.
    7. Nilss Olekalns & Kalvinder Shields, 2008. "Nowcasting, Business Cycle Dating and the Interpretation of New Information when Real Time Data are Available," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1040, The University of Melbourne.
    8. repec:spr:qualqt:v:51:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s11135-016-0416-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. O Claveria & E Pons & J Surinach, 2006. "Quantification of Expectations. Are They Useful for Forecasting Inflation?," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 11(2), pages 19-38, September.
    10. Oscar Claveria & Enric Monte & Salvador Torra, 2017. "Let the data do the talking: Empirical modelling of survey-based expectations by means of genetic programming," IREA Working Papers 201711, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised May 2017.
    11. Hasan Bakhshi & Anthony Yates, 1998. "Are UK inflation expectations rational?," Bank of England working papers 81, Bank of England.
    12. Olivier Biau & Hélène Erkel-Rousse & Nicolas Ferrari, 2006. "Réponses individuelles aux enquêtes de conjoncture et prévision de la production manufacturière," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 395(1), pages 91-116.
    13. Dr Martin Weale & Dr. James Mitchell, 2002. "Aggregate versus Disaggregate Survey-Based Indicators of Economic Activity (revised January 2005)," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 194, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:104:y:1994:i:423:p:372-85. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/resssea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.