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Economic man and social woman: Determinants of immigrants' life satisfaction

Author

Listed:
  • Sarinda Taengnoi

    () (University of Wisconsin Oshkosh)

Abstract

This study examines life satisfaction among immigrants in the US, a topic that has been little discussed in immigration studies. The New Immigrant Survey-Pilot is used to analyze the impact of different forms of capital, namely human, financial, and social capital, on life satisfaction and how they affect male and female immigrants differently. The empirical results confirm the differences in factors contributing to life satisfaction between males and females. Some forms of social capital significantly affect female satisfaction but not male satisfaction, while financial capital tends to increase male satisfaction but not female satisfaction. Understanding what contributes to immigrants' life satisfaction is important as certain findings could be used to shape an effective immigration policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Sarinda Taengnoi, 2014. "Economic man and social woman: Determinants of immigrants' life satisfaction," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(3), pages 1530-1549.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-13-00658
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    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2014/Volume34/EB-14-V34-I3-P140.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Yaman, F. & Cubi-Molla, P., 2017. "Why Do Immigrants Report Lower Life Satisfaction?," Research Papers 001871, Office of Health Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Happiness; Life satisfaction; Immigrants; Social capital; Human capital;

    JEL classification:

    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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