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Modelling import demand behaviour in Ghana: a re-examination

  • George Marbuah

    ()

    (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)

This paper empirically models Ghana's real import demand with respect to disaggregated expenditure components of final demand, relative price and international reserves. Using cointegration and error-correction models, the study finds significant differences between long-run and short-run import demand elasticities. Private consumption expenditure has the biggest impact on the demand for imports. Macroeconomic policies designed to influence imports should consider the relative impact and behaviour of each disaggregated import demand determinant.

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File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2013/Volume33/EB-13-V33-I1-P46.pdf
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Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 33 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 482-493

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Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-12-00185
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  1. Xu, Xinpeng, 2002. "The dynamic-optimizing approach to import demand: a structural model," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 265-270, January.
  2. Seema Narayan & Paresh Kumar Narayan, 2005. "An empirical analysis of Fiji's import demand function," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 32(2), pages 158-168, May.
  3. Tang, Tuck Cheong, 2003. "An empirical analysis of China's aggregate import demand function," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 142-163.
  4. Guncavdi, Oner & Ulengin, Burc, 2008. "Aggregate Imports and Expenditure Components in Turkey: Theoretical and Empirical Assessment," MPRA Paper 9622, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Goldstein, Morris & Khan, Mohsin S., 1985. "Income and price effects in foreign trade," Handbook of International Economics, in: R. W. Jones & P. B. Kenen (ed.), Handbook of International Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 20, pages 1041-1105 Elsevier.
  6. Abdelhak Senhadji, 1998. "Time-Series Estimation of Structural Import Demand Equations: A Cross-Country Analysis," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 45(2), pages 236-268, June.
  7. Frimpong, Joseph Magnus & Oteng-Abayie, Eric Fosu, 2006. "Aggregate Import demand and Expenditure Components in Ghana:An Econometric Analysis," MPRA Paper 599, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 15 Aug 0002.
  8. Elliott, Graham & Rothenberg, Thomas J & Stock, James H, 1996. "Efficient Tests for an Autoregressive Unit Root," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 64(4), pages 813-36, July.
  9. M. Hashem Pesaran & Yongcheol Shin & Richard J. Smith, 2001. "Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 289-326.
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