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Further theoretical and empirical evidence on money to growth relation

Author

Listed:
  • Christophe Rault

    () (LEO, University of Orléans and EDHEC Business School)

  • Alexandru Minea

    () (LEO, University of Orléans)

  • Patrick Villieu

    () (LEO, University of Orléans)

Abstract

This paper proposes a theoretical growth model where seigniorage can be used to finance productive public spending, and show the existence of nonlinear effects between seigniorage and economic growth. Empirical evidence based on panel regression techniques provides some support for these nonlinear effects on a sample of OECD countries over the 1978-2005 period.

Suggested Citation

  • Christophe Rault & Alexandru Minea & Patrick Villieu, 2008. "Further theoretical and empirical evidence on money to growth relation," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 28(13), pages 1.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-08aa0020
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Stockman, Alan C., 1981. "Anticipated inflation and the capital stock in a cash in-advance economy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 387-393.
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    3. Burdekin, Richard C.K. & Denzau, Arthur T. & Keil, Manfred W. & Sitthiyot, Thitithep & Willett, Thomas D., 2004. "When does inflation hurt economic growth? Different nonlinearities for different economies," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 519-532, September.
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    5. Michael Sarel, 1996. "Nonlinear Effects of Inflation on Economic Growth," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 43(1), pages 199-215, March.
    6. Anthony Philip Thirlwall & A.C. Barton, 1971. "Inflation and growth: the international evidence," Banca Nazionale del Lavoro Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 24(98), pages 263-275.
    7. Thorvaldur Gylfason, 1991. "Inflation, Growth, and External Debt: A View of the Landscape," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(3), pages 279-297, September.
    8. Satya Paul & Colm Kearney & Kabir Chowdhury, 1997. "Inflation and economic growth: a multi-country empirical analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(10), pages 1387-1401.
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    11. Turnovsky, Stephen J., 1996. "Optimal tax, debt, and expenditure policies in a growing economy," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 21-44, April.
    12. Sung Kim & Thomas Willett, 2000. "Is the negative correlation between inflation and growth real? An analysis of the effects of the oil supply shocks," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(3), pages 141-147.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
    • E6 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook

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