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Information sharing in emerging credit markets

Author

Listed:
  • Marco Di Maggio

    () (University of Chicago Graduate School of Business)

Abstract

This paper examines the lack of information flow in the credit markets of developing countries. We show that the miscoordination among financial intermediaries might explain why lenders don't share their information about the borrowers. The competition effect of more transparency in the market leads to a higher probability of default of the firm, also generating credit rationing.

Suggested Citation

  • Marco Di Maggio, 2007. "Information sharing in emerging credit markets," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 4(37), pages 1-7.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-07d80008
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Pagano, Marco & Jappelli, Tullio, 1993. " Information Sharing in Credit Markets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 48(5), pages 1693-1718, December.
    2. Hellwig, Christian, 2002. "Public Information, Private Information, and the Multiplicity of Equilibria in Coordination Games," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 107(2), pages 191-222, December.
    3. Galina Hale, 2005. "Courage to Capital? A Model of the Effects of Rating Agencies on Sovereign Debt Roll–over," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp062, IIIS.
    4. Parikshit Ghosh & Debraj Ray, 2016. "Information and Enforcement in Informal Credit Markets," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 83(329), pages 59-90, January.
    5. Morris, Stephen & Shin, Hyun Song, 2004. "Coordination risk and the price of debt," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 133-153, February.
    6. Karp, Larry & Lee, In Ho & Mason, Robin, 2007. "A global game with strategic substitutes and complements," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 155-175, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Coordination.;

    JEL classification:

    • D8 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty
    • C7 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory

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