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Learning in Tournaments with Inter-Generational Advice


  • Ananish Chaudhuri

    () (University of Auckland)

  • Barry Sopher

    () (Rutgers University)

  • Andrew Schotter

    () (New York University)


We study learning in a simulated tournament using an inter-generational framework. Here a group of subjects are recruited into the lab and play the stage game for 10 rounds. After his participation is over, each player is replaced by another player, his laboratory descendant, who then plays the game for another 10 rounds as a member of a fresh group of subjects. A particular player in generation t+1 can (1) see the history of choices by his generation t predecessor and (2) receive advice from that predecessor via free-form messages that generation t players leave for their generation t+1 successors. We find that the presence of advice makes a difference in that the experimental groups who get advice perform better – their decisions are closer to the Nash equilibrium – compared to a control group of subjects that plays the game with no recourse to such advice.

Suggested Citation

  • Ananish Chaudhuri & Barry Sopher & Andrew Schotter, 2006. "Learning in Tournaments with Inter-Generational Advice," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 3(26), pages 1-16.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-06c90004

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Merlo, Antonio & Schotter, Andrew, 2003. "Learning by not doing: an experimental investigation of observational learning," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 116-136, January.
    2. Andrew Schotter, 2003. "Decision Making with Naive Advice," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(2), pages 196-201, May.
    3. Bull, Clive & Schotter, Andrew & Weigelt, Keith, 1987. "Tournaments and Piece Rates: An Experimental Study," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(1), pages 1-33, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. David Cooper & John Lightle, 2013. "The gift of advice: communication in a bilateral gift exchange game," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 16(4), pages 443-477, December.
    2. Cooper, David J. & Kagel, John H., 2016. "A failure to communicate: an experimental investigation of the effects of advice on strategic play," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 24-45.
    3. repec:eee:jeborg:v:142:y:2017:i:c:p:11-23 is not listed on IDEAS

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    JEL classification:

    • C9 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments
    • C7 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory


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