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Traffic accidents: an econometric investigation

Author

Listed:
  • Tito Moreira

    () (Catholic University)

  • Adolfo Sachsida

    () (Catholic University)

  • Loureiro Paulo

    () (Catholic University)

Abstract

Based on a sample of drivers in Brasilia's streets, this article investigates whether distraction explains traffic accidents. A probit model is estimated to determine the predictive power of several variables on traffic accidents. The main conclusion drawn from this study is that the proxies used to measure distraction, such as the use of cell phones and cigarette smoking in a moving vehicle, are significant factors in determining traffic accidents.

Suggested Citation

  • Tito Moreira & Adolfo Sachsida & Loureiro Paulo, 2004. "Traffic accidents: an econometric investigation," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 18(3), pages 1-7.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-04r40001
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    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/pubs/EB/2004/Volume18/EB-04R40001A.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Peirson, John & Skinner, Ian & Vickerman, Roger, 1998. "The Microeconomic Analysis of the External Costs of Road Accidents," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 65(259), pages 429-440, August.
    2. Gary S. Becker, 1974. "Crime and Punishment: An Economic Approach," NBER Chapters,in: Essays in the Economics of Crime and Punishment, pages 1-54 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Dickerson, Andrew & Peirson, John & Vickerman, Roger, 2000. "Road Accidents and Traffic Flows: An Econometric Investigation," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 67(265), pages 101-121, February.
    4. Heckman, James J, 1990. "Varieties of Selection Bias," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 313-318, May.
    5. Steven D. Levitt & Jack Porter, 2001. "How Dangerous Are Drinking Drivers?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 109(6), pages 1198-1237, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:8:y:2008:i:10:p:1-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Claudio Djissey Shikida & Guilherme de Castro & Ari Francisco de Araujo Jr., 2008. "Economic Determinants of Driver's Behavior in Minas Gerais," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 8(10), pages 1-7.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    discriminant analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • R4 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics
    • C1 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General

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