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Family influence in fertility: A longitudinal analysis of sibling correlations in first birth risk and completed fertility among Swedish men and women

  • Johan Dahlberg

    (Stockholm University)

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    No abstract is available for this item.

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol29/9/29-9.pdf
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    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 29 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 9 (August)
    Pages: 233-246

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:29:y:2013:i:9
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

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    1. Douglas Anderton & Noriko Tsuya & Lee Bean & Geraldine Mineau, 1987. "Intergenerational transmission of relative fertility and life course patterns," Demography, Springer, vol. 24(4), pages 467-480, November.
    2. Joan Kahn & Kay Anderson, 1992. "Intergenerational patterns of teenage fertility," Demography, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 39-57, February.
    3. Gary Solon & Mary Corcoran & GRoger Gordon & Deborah Laren, 1991. "A Longitudinal Analysis of Sibling Correlations in Economic Status," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(3), pages 509-534.
    4. Joseph Rodgers & Hans-Peter Kohler & Kirsten Kyvik & Kaare Christensen, 2001. "Behavior genetic modeling of human fertility: findings from a contemporary danish twin study," Demography, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 29-42, February.
    5. repec:cai:poeine:pope_902_0341 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. William Axinn & Marin Clarkberg & Arland Thornton, 1994. "Family influences on family size preferences," Demography, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 65-79, February.
    7. Lena Lindahl, 2011. "A comparison of family and neighborhood effects on grades, test scores, educational attainment and income—evidence from Sweden," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 207-226, June.
    8. Björklund, Anders & Jäntti, Markus & Lindquist, Matthew J., 2007. "Family Background and Income during the Rise of the Welfare State: Brother Correlations in Income for Swedish Men Born 1932-1968," IZA Discussion Papers 3000, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Nan Johnson & C. Stokes, 1976. "Family size in successive generations: The effects of birth order, intergenerational change in lifestyle, and familial satisfaction," Demography, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 175-187, May.
    10. Torkild Lyngstad & Alexia Prskawetz, 2010. "Do siblings’ fertility decisions influence each other?," Demography, Springer, vol. 47(4), pages 923-934, November.
    11. Otis Duncan & Ronald Freedman & J. Coble & Doris Slesinger, 1965. "Marital Fertility and Size of Family of Orientation," Demography, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 508-515, March.
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