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An application of the variable-r method to subpopulation growth rates in a 19th century agricultural population

Author

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  • Corey Sparks

    (University of Texas at San Antonio)

Abstract

This paper presents an analysis of the differential growth rates of the farming and non-farming segments of a rural Scottish community during the 19th and early 20th centuries using the variable-r method allowing for net migration. Using this method, I find that the farming population of Orkney, Scotland, showed less variability in their reproduction and growth rates than the non-farming population during a period of net population decline. I conclude by suggesting that the variable-r method can be used in general cases where the relative growth of subpopulations or subpopulation reproduction is of interest.

Suggested Citation

  • Corey Sparks, 2009. "An application of the variable-r method to subpopulation growth rates in a 19th century agricultural population," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 21(2), pages 23-64, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:21:y:2009:i:2
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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol21/2/21-2.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Holger Strulik, 2004. "Economic growth and stagnation with endogenous health and fertility," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 17(3), pages 433-453, August.
    2. Siân Curtis & Ian Diamond & John McDonald, 1993. "Birth interval and family effects on postneonatal mortality in Brazil," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 30(1), pages 33-43, February.
    3. Hillard Kaplan & Michael Gurven, 2008. "Top-down and bottom-up research in biodemography," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(44), pages 1587-1602, September.
    4. Shiro Horiuchi & Samuel Preston, 1988. "Age-specific growth rates: The legacy of past population dynamics," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 25(3), pages 429-441, August.
    5. Thomas LeGrand & Todd Koppenhaver & Nathalie Mondain & Sara Randall, 2003. "Reassessing the Insurance Effect: A Qualitative Analysis of Fertility Behavior in Senegal and Zimbabwe," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 29(3), pages 375-403.
    6. Katherine Curtis White, 2008. "Population change and farm dependence: Temporal and spatial variation in the U.S. great plains, 1900–2000," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 45(2), pages 363-386, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    agricultural population; Scotland; subpopulation growth rates; variable-r method;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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