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The Internet, the Market, and Communication: Don't Ignore the Shoe While Admiring the Shine


  • Dwight R. Lee


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  • Dwight R. Lee, 2001. "The Internet, the Market, and Communication: Don't Ignore the Shoe While Admiring the Shine," Cato Journal, Cato Journal, Cato Institute, vol. 20(3), Fall.
  • Handle: RePEc:cto:journl:v:20:y:2001:i:3:p:

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Williamson, Steve & Wright, Randall, 1994. "Barter and Monetary Exchange under Private Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(1), pages 104-123, March.
    2. Selgin, George A, 1994. "On Ensuring the Acceptability of a New Fiat Money," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 26(4), pages 808-826, November.
    3. Kiyotaki, Nobuhiro & Wright, Randall, 1991. "A contribution to the pure theory of money," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 215-235, April.
    4. Kiyotaki, Nobuhiro & Wright, Randall, 1989. "On Money as a Medium of Exchange," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(4), pages 927-954, August.
    5. Ritter, Joseph A, 1995. "The Transition from Barter to Fiat Money," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(1), pages 134-149, March.
    6. Grossman, Herschel I., 1991. "Monetary economics : A review essay," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 323-345, October.
    7. Faust, Jon, 1989. "Supernovas in Monetary Theory: Does the Ultimate Sunspot Rule Out Money?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(4), pages 872-881, September.
    8. Nobuhiro Kiyotaki & Randall Wright, 1992. "Acceptability, means of payment, and media of exchange," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Sum, pages 18-21.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tim Groseclose & Jeffrey Milyo, 2005. "A Measure of Media Bias," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(4), pages 1191-1237.
    2. Stephen D. Williamson, 2002. "Private money and counterfeiting," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Sum, pages 37-57.
    3. Degens, Philipp, 2013. "Alternative Geldkonzepte - ein Literaturbericht," MPIfG Discussion Paper 13/1, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.

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    JEL classification:

    • R00 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General - - - General
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General


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