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Economic Growth and Regional Income Disparities in Canada and the Northern United States

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  • Serge Coulombe
  • Kathleen M. Day

Abstract

This paper compares the evolution of regional disparaties in per capita incomes in Canada and the 12 American states along Canada's southern border. The phenomenon of capital accumulation as described by the neoclassical growth model can explain much of the observed decline in regional dispersion in Canada relative to the northern states. However, it appears that Canadians are more likely than residents of the northern states to remain in regions where they do not have jobs, a factor which contributes to the persistently higher level of regional dispersion of output per capita in Canada.

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  • Serge Coulombe & Kathleen M. Day, 1999. "Economic Growth and Regional Income Disparities in Canada and the Northern United States," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 25(2), pages 155-178, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:25:y:1999:i:2:p:155-178
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
    2. Barro, Robert J & Mankiw, N Gregory & Sala-i-Martin, Xavier, 1995. "Capital Mobility in Neoclassical Models of Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(1), pages 103-115, March.
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    4. Sala-i-Martin, Xavier X, 1996. "The Classical Approach to Convergence Analysis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(437), pages 1019-1036, July.
    5. Galor, Oded, 1996. "Convergence? Inferences from Theoretical Models," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(437), pages 1056-1069, July.
    6. Robert J. Barro, 1998. "Determinants of Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Empirical Study," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262522543, January.
    7. Paul Krugman, 1992. "Geography and Trade," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262610868, January.
    8. Marvin McInnis, 1968. "The Trend of Regional Income Differentials in Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 1(2), pages 440-470, May.
    9. Carlino, Gerald & Mills, Leonard, 1996. "Are U.S. regional incomes converging? Reply," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 599-601, December.
    10. Gregory Mankiw, 1995. "The Growth of Nations," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 26(1, 25th A), pages 275-326.
    11. McCallum, John, 1995. "National Borders Matter: Canada-U.S. Regional Trade Patterns," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 615-623, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Surendra Gera & Samuel Laryea & Thitima Songsakul, 2005. "International Mobility of Skilled Labour: Analytical and Empirical Issues, and Research Priorities," International Trade 0507004, EconWPA.
    2. Firouz Fallahi & Gabriel Rodríguez, 2011. "Convergence In The Canadian Provinces: Evidence Using Unemployment Rates," Documentos de Trabajo / Working Papers 2011-322, Departamento de Economía - Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú.
    3. MIHUŢ Ioana Sorina & LUŢAS Mihaela, 2013. "Testing Convergence And Divergence Among Eu Member States," Interdisciplinary Management Research, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Faculty of Economics, Croatia, vol. 9, pages 459-468.
    4. Lukas Matejovsky & Sandeep Mohapatra & Bodo Steiner, 2014. "The Dynamic Effects of Entrepreneurship on Regional Economic Growth: Evidence from Canada," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(4), pages 611-639, December.
    5. Evan Capeluck, 2014. "Convergence Across Provincial Economies in Canada: Trends, Drivers, and Implications," CSLS Research Reports 2014-03, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
    6. Serge Coulombe, 2000. "New Evidence of Convergence Across Canadian Provinces: The Role of Urbanization," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(8), pages 713-725.
    7. Juan David Barón R, 2003. "¿Que sucedió con las disparidades económicas regionales en Colombia entre 1980 y el 2000?," Documentos de trabajo sobre Economía Regional y Urbana 38, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    8. Basher, Syed A. & Fachin, Stefano, 2008. "The long-term decline of internal migration in Canada – Ontario as a case study," MPRA Paper 6685, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Kessler, Anke & Lessmann, Christian, 2010. "Interregional Redistribution and Regional Disparities: How Equalization Does (Not) Work," CEPR Discussion Papers 8133, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Chen, Shunlong & Arun, Thankom G., 2004. "Openness, Technological Capabilities and Regional Disparities in China," Centre on Regulation and Competition (CRC) Working papers 30622, University of Manchester, Institute for Development Policy and Management (IDPM).
    11. Joseph DeJuan & Marc Tomljanovich, 2005. "Income convergence across Canadian provinces in the 20th century: Almost but not quite there," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 39(3), pages 567-592, September.

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