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The Knowledge-Based Economy: Shifts in Industrial Output

Listed author(s):
  • Surendra Gera
  • Kurt Mang
Registered author(s):

    This paper analyses industrial structure in Canada over the period 1971 to 1991 using Statistics Canada's input-output model and explores more closely the role played by the "new economy" industries, those industries where innovation through the uses of knowledge, technology, and skills is the key to generating growth. The conclusions indicate that Canadian industrial structure is becoming increasingly knowledge-based and technology- intensive, with competitive advantage being rooted in innovation and ideas, the foundations of the new economy. While in the past domestic demand mainly influenced the growth of industries, trade is becoming much more important. High-knowledge industries in the tradable sector seem to have benefited the most from export performance; import competition has hastened the relative decline of low-knowledge industries.

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    File URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0317-0861%28199806%2924%3A2%3C149%3ATKESII%3E2.0.CO%3B2-6
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    Article provided by University of Toronto Press in its journal Canadian Public Policy.

    Volume (Year): 24 (1998)
    Issue (Month): 2 (June)
    Pages: 149-184

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    Handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:24:y:1998:i:2:p:149-184
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    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
    2. Gene M. Grossman & Elhanan Helpman, 1991. "Quality Ladders in the Theory of Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(1), pages 43-61.
    3. J. Bradford De Long & Lawrence H. Summers, 1991. "Equipment Investment and Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 445-502.
    4. Lilien, David M, 1982. "Sectoral Shifts and Cyclical Unemployment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(4), pages 777-793, August.
    5. Surendra Gera & Gilles Grenier, 1994. "Interindustry Wage Differentials and Efficiency Wages: Some Canadian Evidence," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 27(1), pages 81-100, February.
    6. Layard, Richard & Nickell, Stephen & Jackman, Richard, 2005. "Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199279173.
    7. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-437.
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