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The Knowledge-Based Economy: Shifts in Industrial Output

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  • Surendra Gera
  • Kurt Mang

Abstract

This paper analyses industrial structure in Canada over the period 1971 to 1991 using Statistics Canada's input-output model and explores more closely the role played by the "new economy" industries, those industries where innovation through the uses of knowledge, technology, and skills is the key to generating growth. The conclusions indicate that Canadian industrial structure is becoming increasingly knowledge-based and technology- intensive, with competitive advantage being rooted in innovation and ideas, the foundations of the new economy. While in the past domestic demand mainly influenced the growth of industries, trade is becoming much more important. High-knowledge industries in the tradable sector seem to have benefited the most from export performance; import competition has hastened the relative decline of low-knowledge industries.

Suggested Citation

  • Surendra Gera & Kurt Mang, 1998. "The Knowledge-Based Economy: Shifts in Industrial Output," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 24(2), pages 149-184, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:24:y:1998:i:2:p:149-184
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
    2. Lilien, David M, 1982. "Sectoral Shifts and Cyclical Unemployment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(4), pages 777-793, August.
    3. Gene M. Grossman & Elhanan Helpman, 1991. "Quality Ladders in the Theory of Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(1), pages 43-61.
    4. Layard, Richard & Nickell, Stephen & Jackman, Richard, 2005. "Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199279173.
    5. J. Bradford De Long & Lawrence H. Summers, 1991. "Equipment Investment and Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 445-502.
    6. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-437.
    7. Surendra Gera & Gilles Grenier, 1994. "Interindustry Wage Differentials and Efficiency Wages: Some Canadian Evidence," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 27(1), pages 81-100, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ian Keay, 2008. "Resource Intensive Production and Aggregate Economic Performance," Working Papers 1176, Queen's University, Department of Economics.

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